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Archive for the ‘Fashion’ Category

woa-gabriela-perezetti-main-smallMy whole family used to use this seamstress, Tota, … growing up in Uruguay there were no fancy stores around – the nicest thing you could do was get European fabrics and have things made … We wouldn’t buy a lot but for each important stage of life or big event we’d have something made. There’s a suit from my mother, this olive wool skirtsuit with a blazer that has, like, a military seal and her initials embroidered on the pocket … I always loved the whole outfit, so much so that when we launched the first collection, I had that suit in it. It’s always been a reference to quality materials made to last …

Gabriela Hearst, women’s fashion designer. Quote from Elle magazine, October 2017.

I am a big fan of custom made clothing. I have an expanding wardrobe of fashions made just for me from dresses, to blouses, to a beautiful 1920s inspired coat.

It’s pure pleasure to don perfectly fitted clothing for which you have chosen the design and fabrics. Each piece is unique, well made, and it feels extra good to have supported local seamstresses/designers.

Also, I can relate to Ms. Hearst’s fondness for her mother’s wardrobe. What is it about our mother’s clothing from our childhoods? I too have memories of what my mother wore – specific images that I like to revisit. I even have some of the vintage pieces right out of her closet. Many of them special occasion outfits, but it’s the everyday pieces that I’m drawn to. The ones I saw all the time – the tweed skirts and Oxford shirts; slacks and desert boots. The outfits that identified a mom as my Mom.

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I’m taking another class in the San Francisco City College Fashion Department – this semester it’s Textile Analysis, which I’m really enjoying. So that puts me in the city once a week and taking BART.

About a month ago when the weather was still a little warm, I popped onto the train going home and settled in (standing). As usual I started looking around. At first this women didn’t really catch my eye but after a couple of perusals, I stopped on her.

I noticed the details of her sartorial choices and how it all worked together.

First, you can’t really see in the photo, but her slacks are cuffed. A nice detail, and one that is a perfect contrast with the Berks. You don’t expect to see Birkenstocks with tailored slacks. Also note that the hem is just a tad short. Much longer would look sloppy. Beyond that the shoes are in white. If you’ve got to wear Berks outside the house, white in smooth leather takes away the hippie vibe and perhaps even makes the look, in its way,  chic.

She tied in the white Berks with her white trendy longish cardigan. The slub knit yarn offers some texture. She added a bit of subtle color with a lightweight teal sweater (cotton/rayon?) and a nicely wrapped scarf in the colors of autumn. I love the quilted handbag in black (more texture).

No we’re not talking high fashion here but it’s her own simple style and I think it looks great!

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Danielle-Steel-QuotesStyle simply IS. You can’t buy it. You can’t pay people to give it to you, and you cannot fake it. You have it or you don’t. Truly stylish, drop dead chic women have style at 15 or 97. It really is ageless … The trend today of being dressed “by someone” makes most women appear to be wearing someone else’s looks, or as if they’ve borrowed their clothes … Women need to be braver about wearing their own style and looks, even if they make some mistakes. The mistakes can be cool too!

Danielle Steel, romance novelist and San Francisco socialite. This quote was taken from an essay Ms. Steel wrote for Harper’s Bazaar (November 2017).

I spotted Ms. Steel one time when I was on assignment covering the reopening of the Chanel store on Maiden Lane in San Francisco. She was sporting a fur coat and seemingly having fun trying on shoes.

As for having style, well, sure some women (and men) just have a sense for what is stylish but I don’t know that one who perhaps doesn’t have a natural affinity can’t figure it out. If someone really wants to pay attention and work on it, they too can have style. Why not? And that’s where “being dressed by someone” can help. A stylist acts as a guide and gets their client on the right track. It’s true you can’t buy style and no one can give it to you. It has to come from within, so to speak. But it is something that can develop. I think it’s the process of developing and growing that makes fashion fun.

Speaking of style of a different sort, Ms. Steel evidently still types her manuscripts on a typewriter. HB published her original typed version complete with cross outs and handwritten edits. Now that’s true (not fake) STYLE.

 

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Hanbok, reproduced from an 18th century painting.

Three years in the making, Couture Korea is the first major exhibition of Korean fashion in the United States and exclusive to San Francisco’s Asian Art Museum. On now through February 4, 2018 this fashion exhibit explores traditional Korean clothing from the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910) to the present. Included are reproductions and reinterpretations of traditional clothing as well as original modern works by top Korean designers.

The 120-piece exhibit covers three galleries starting with a look at tradition. What is Hanbok is the first gallery where we learn that hanbok is traditional clothing for men and women during the Joseon Dynasty, when modesty was the fashion of the day. For women the look was a high full skirt called a chima, paired with a longer blouse called jeogori, which would fit loose or tight. (The originators of layering.) Men sported a loose top, pants and a robe. Fabrics such as silk organza were used.

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Jin Teok’s reinterpreted  bridal robe.

Between East and West comes next and features designs by Jin Teok, including a video of a recent fashion show and a reinterpreted hwarot (bridal robe) combining  embroidered silk fabric with denim. Also in this gallery are pieces by Chanel’s Karl Lagerfeld from his Korean inspired 2016 Cruise collection, which premiered in Seoul.

My favorite is the third and final gallery. From Seoul to San Francisco is all about modern Korean fashion. Featured are two trendsetting designers Im Seonoc and Jung Misun. Each woman is inspired by traditional Korean clothing but with an understanding of modern needs and desires.

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A new twist on tradition by Jung Misun.

A video interview with the two explains their different approaches. Jung Misun says that while she’s inspired by traditional silhouettes, the fabrics are too delicate and she finds that modern women want more comfort and ease. “If someone were to ask me to wear hanbok and I were to think of an uncomfortable aspect of it – it would be the fabric … Therefore I replaced the delicate fabrics of hanbok with everyday fabrics, such as knits and wool.”

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South Korean fashion designer Im Seonoc.

Im Seonoc is a sustainable designer dedicated to zero waste in her clothing production. She uses only neoprene (usually used for wetsuits), which creates a nice clear cut. Any leftover scraps are incorporated elsewhere in her designs. Instead of stitching she glues or uses high-pressure bonding for seams. Speaking with Ms. Seonoc, she told me she’s created her own neoprene – something lighter and even easier to work with.

There is something completely unique about Korean style. Simple, elegant, refined and hard to capture, which makes it ultra chic. Couture Korea offers a rare opportunity to learn about traditional and modern Korean fashions and how they connect.

It’s a must-see! I also recommend an upcoming panel of fashionables on November 19th, 1-2:30. Moderated by the San Francisco Chronicle style reporter, Tony Bravo the panel will include fashion trendsetters and designers discussing what inspires them. This panel is part of K-Fashion Bash – a day of events celebrating Korean pop culture.

What fun!

Click here for more information. 

 

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Jin Teok with her daughter Ro Sungun at the Asian Art Museum.

American fashion is very artistic and at the same time very wearable and good for the market, as well as the look. 

Jin Teok, South Korean fashion designer.

I had the pleasure of meeting Ms. Teok and her daughter at the press preview of Couture Korea, the new exhibit on now at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco. Her fashions are included in this exhibit of modern and re-imaginings of traditional Korean clothing. I asked Ms. Teok her impression of American fashion.

Known for her reconstruction of the classic white shirt, Ms. Teok has been designing for over fifty years. She was the only Korean designer to be included among the top 500 world fashion icons in the UK publication, The Fashion Book (Phaidon, 1998).

Watch for more about Jin Teok and my review of Couture Korea coming out later this week on OverDressedforLife.

 

 

 

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christy-turlington-business-of-being-born_oywna4The best way to protect young models is to keep them in school and off sets until they are adults. But that’s only part of the problem. We need to teach our girls, and young boys, how to protect themselves and defend themselves against predators in every area of their lives. Sexual harassment can happen anywhere and at any time. In the playground, in school, on the bus, in crowded public spaces. Accepting this and preparing for it will help more of us know how to handle it when it does happen.

Christy Turlington Burns – 1980s super model, founder of the non-profit Every Mother Counts. 

This quote is from a Q&A with WWD.

Well stated. There’s a lot of talk these days about sexual harassment in fashion and elsewhere. I suspect that unfortunately, there are very few women who have not been sexually harassed. The severity varies but the impact is similar. Of course we mustn’t put up with it and we should fight it in every way we can, but I seriously doubt that we will ever be able to erase sexual harassment entirely. There will always be jerks in the world. So, Ms. Burns’ advice is good. Let’s teach our girls and boys how to safeguard themselves. While we also teach our children to see and respect one another as equals.

Everything begins with awareness and education.

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Edith HeadIn the days of the motion picture industry and even as late as the 1950s, stars had trademarks: Jean Harlow with her white satin dresses; Dietrich with her tailored slacks; Garbo with her slouch hats and trench coats; and Marilyn Monroe with her slightly tousled hair and tight clothes. But as we moved into the 1960s, the female stars didn’t really care what what they wore on the set or off. If two stars showed up at a party wearing the same dress, neither of them cared. Nobody cared. It was as if individualism had been thrown out the window in the name of realism. 

Edith Head (1887-1981), Hollywood costume designer.

Ms. Head certainly had a signature look or trade mark – she always sported a suit, she wore her hair up in a tight bun, and she loved those very round glasses.

My signature look is hats! I sport a hat of some kind every day. My mother likes to wear a silk scarf. What’s your signature look?

Happy Birthday to Ms. Head who would have celebrated on October 28th.

 

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