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Posts Tagged ‘American fashion’

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Marc Jacobs strikes a pose in Harper’s Bazaar, May 2020. Photo: Zoey Grossman.

I was leaving my shrink one day in a Celine leopard coat and rhinestone hair clips – I was done up. I noticed this sanitation worker staring at me and thought he was a hater, but then he said, ‘Love that outfit, man, you go.’

Marc Jacobs – American fashion designer.

I love that his handbag, by Hermes, has a cup holder.

Marc Jacobs is a controversial designer, but I have always liked him. Often his designs are vintage inspired, which appeals to me.

Word has it that Jacobs has lost his way in fashion. I took a peek online at his spring 2020 show and he’s all over the map. There’s no cohesion to the line, which includes 40s-inspired suits, 70s-style maxi dresses, 60s mini-dresses and some avant-garde dresses a la Balenciaga. All colors, all patterns, shapes, silhouettes are included. Hats run the gamut, too.

In total contradiction, the show itself was minimalist. It took place in a large empty venue with no runway, none of the usual fashion show hoopla. Just the audience and the models, who initially came out all together and walked between and past the audience, reconvened in the back and then came out one at a time, keeping a reasonable pace (nice for journalists and anyone who really wants to see the clothes).

I read that since the shutdown Jacobs has been posting selfies on Instagram. That’s got me wondering what his post-pandemic designs will be like.

 

 

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Simple, elegant, comfortable. Jackie Kennedy Onassis did it well.

For many critics, the American style of dressing has gone too far. Yoga pants, hoodies, and flip-flops appear in all sorts of places they shouldn’t, like restaurants, offices, and European capitals … Comfort is not to blame. It appears that we’ve forgotten about panache. The most classic American women style icons always perfected both. Think of Jackie O. and Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy, Lauren Hutton and Michelle Obama. They share a simplicity and elegance in their choice of clothes, adding a pop of flair with a scarf or hat, a hair twist, or an elegant shoe. 

From the book Brooklyn Street Style: The No Rules Guide to Fashion by Anya Sacharow and Shawn Dahl (Abrams Image).

This quote points out something very important – that comfortable fashion is not the same as sloppy fashion, or it doesn’t have to be.

We can be casual and still chic by keeping it tidy, choose the right size, and add an accessory or two.

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Bonnie Cashin in 1957.I was wearing boots long before they became popular. I used to buy Haymarket boots in London, regular riding ones. Now that everyone is wearing them, I have a quarrel with the shoemakers. I love things that work but today’s boots don’t work. They let the water in. A boot should be waterproof. I keep telling them.

– Bonnie Cashin (1915-2000), American fashion designer.

Yes! Waterproof! I recall a nasty pair of boots I had as a kid (maybe 8) that let the rain water seep in. Not fun but a thing of the past. It seems the shoemakers did listen to Ms. Cashin.

She made this comment in 1970, when boots were first hitting their stride among the fashionables. Then they went out of fashion for awhile and came back to stay sometime in the 1990s.

Now that it’s officially autumn, boots are out and about. Have you noticed? It seems every style is in, but particularly ankle boots and over the knee.

By the way, September 28th would have been Ms. Cashin’s 101st birthday. Happy Birthday to the first woman of boots!

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