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Posts Tagged ‘artists' style’

Yayoi Kusama and Joseph Cornell, circa 1970.

I was cute and lovely and always dressed nicely so I stood out. So people would stop and look at us like, ‘who’s that couple?’

Yayoi Kusama, Japanese artist.

I recently watched the documentary, Kusama Infinity. While living in New York in the 1960s Ms. Kusama dated American artist Joseph Cornell, who was many years older than she.

Ms. Kusama experienced a lot of challenges and hardship as an artist during a time when women in the NY art scene where not taken seriously. Still, she persisted and received some acclaim for work such as her soft sculptures and installations. Having endured much trauma in her childhood, she suffered from hallucinations; to help manage these frightening episodes she drew them, which is where her consistent use of nets and dots come from.

Since the 1990s Ms. Kusama has become an internationally recognized pop artist and today attracts millions of people to her exhibits. She also has crossed over into fashion, selling her own designs in department stores and collaborating with brand designers such as Louis Vuitton.

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Betye Saar, Harper’s Bazaar.

It seemed like the rule without it being a rule, starting with my sister and me when we were teenagers, that if you want something new to wear, then you had to make it. And I think that theme carried into our adult lives. Even if you find something, then you still take up a hem or add something to make it your own.

Betye Saar, American artist.

This quote is from a conversation with Ms. Saar and her three daughters in Harper’s Bazaar, May 2021.

Ms. Saar has been creating art since the early 1960s and she’s known for prints, collages, and installations that often include found objects.

Making your own clothes is very rewarding. First of all, it’s creative. Also, when you have taken the time and energy to make something you are much more invested in it. There’s no instant gratification, but instead a sense of accomplishment. The best part is that whatever you have created, it’s one of a kind.

I’m also a big fan of changing a new item in some small or big way to make it yours. I do that by changing buttons and I often add a brooch to hats as well as handbags. I also change things for practical reasons, such as taking up the hem on a dress or adding patch pockets to a cardigan sweater. (Who can stand a sweater without pockets?)

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