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Posts Tagged ‘Covid-19’

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Festive satin lounge wear lifts my spirits as does the sparkly ring I have on.

Changing out of street clothes after I return home is something that I’ve always done, for a couple of reasons. One – it’s more comfortable. Two – I find it keeps my nice street clothes nice.

So, I have a small wardrobe of “at home attire.” It’s comprised of comfy cotton flannel pants, long sleeve t-shirts, and reassigned sweaters that are a bit tattered. I also have some pajama style lounge-wear and I usually top everything with a scarf or shawl.

In warmer weather I sport skirts with short-sleeve t-shirts, or I have a selection of simple cotton dresses. Even at home, it feels better to be “put together.” Lately, I’ve also been wearing my jewelry. What the heck – I have it, I like, I wear it!

Now that most of us around the globe are staying home, we’re probably not dressing. Perhaps even staying in our pajamas. Isn’t that kind of depressing? It helps to change into something different every day and show up at our home offices, laptops, or Zoom meetings looking our best under stressful circumstances.

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Michael Beller, Library Manager at Orinda Library, looking dapper while  working from home.

Librarian Michael Beller is doing just that. Working from home, he says that if he’s in a phone meeting or doing chat, he’s sporting his signature bow tie. “Even if they can’t see me, I feel more professional.”

I like that!

Remember, Keep Calm and Keep Your Distance. 

 

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There’s not a lot of information of how long COVID survives on textiles, but lots of places on your textiles can contain metal or plastic. If you’ve touched a contaminated surface with your clothes, sitting in a subway, leaning against a pole, there’s a chance you might bring that back home.

Angelique Corthals, a biomedical researcher and professor of pathology at John Jay College. (This quote is from an article in the New York Times, March 29, 2020. By Sanam Yar. Click here for the full article.)

(Note: the belief is that the virus could live on metal and plastic surfaces three to five days.)

Ms. Corthals also says that’s it’s a good idea to change out of your street clothes once you’re home.  I say that since we don’t know how long Covid-19 lives on textiles, it couldn’t hurt to also spray our street clothes with alcohol.

Remember, Keep Calm and Keep Your Distance. 

 

 

 

 

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IMG_20200319_143040154When I was growing up, my mother had hanging in her closet a cashmere coat, and sitting on the floor underneath the coat was a pair of black apres ski boots in suede. She would tell me that this was her “emergency outfit.” In case of a fire or an earthquake or some other dramatic event that required a quick exit from home (in the middle of the night), she knew what to grab. The heavy coat was for warmth and protection and the boots were sturdy and waterproof. Both were comforting. It made sense to me.

I thought of mom’s armor outfit last week when I was getting ready to leave the house on essential errands. (California has been under a shelter-in-place command since March 17th.)

What’s my emergency outfit?

Like my mother I go for warmth, protection, and comfort. I chose my back hoodie by Champion. Simple and cozy, I like the hood nestled around my neck and although warm, it’s not heavy or bulky. I also slipped on a pair of black leggings. I don’t wear leggings very often but these are kind of silky, comfortable and easy to move in. For color I added a silk flower brooch and a light blue beret, which, by the way, has antique buttons sewed on along the edge. Simple flat ankle boots in black for easy walking.

Finally, I swiped on red lipstick and put on a pair of snappy sunglasses. I was ready!

It’s interesting to note that if it was just normal day (before COVID-19), I would not have chosen this outfit. Most likely I would have worn a skirt and blazer or perhaps my cape. An ensemble that would have required some effort to wear.

I believe clothing provides more than just covering. It boosts confidence and offers both physical and emotional comfort.

Remember, Keep Calm and Keep Your Distance. 

 

 

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Keep Calm and Keep Your Distance. 

 

It seems that keeping your distance cannot be said often enough. Along with:

Stay home if you’re sick. 

Wash your hands.

Observe the shelter-in-place command and go out only for groceries, prescriptions, and medical appointments, or to take care of a family member. (Walks are ok and important for us as long as we keep at least six feet away from others.)

 

Right now this is what individuals can do to help stop the spread of Covid-19.

Keeping calm is also important. Take deep breaths. Slow down. Turn off the news when it gets to be too much.

We can do this!

Covid-19 questions? Go to the CDC website.

 

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IMG_20200319_104650919Here in the Bay Area we are under a shelter-in-place command. To help slow the spread of Covid-19 we have been told to stay home except for essential errands such as grocery shopping, medical appointments, and anyone who is working an essential job.

Others across the country are also doing their part by staying home. Here we are at a distance from friends and family, maybe miles and miles away, maybe just a few blocks.

I have an idea to lift our spirits! Write a letter. Who doesn’t like to get mail? We all do and yet it’s a rarity these days to receive a handwritten note or even a card. Earlier this year Papyrus closed all their stores across the country because of low sales. Hallmark stores also closed many of their locations. It’s sad to say that thank you notes, party invitations, holiday cards have all given way to social media.

I know several people in my life who would enjoy a letter. Something handwritten to say “I’m thinking of you.” It doesn’t have to be long. Even just a postcard with Hello on it could brighten someone’s day.

And here’s another idea – how about a letter writing lesson for kids, who are now studying at home because of school closures. Pull out some paper and colored pencils and have them make a card with a brief note to grandma and grandpa, auntie, cousin, godparent. Better yet, is there an elderly person in the neighborhood? Make a card for them and then on a walk (walking is good too) pop it in their mailbox. What a nice surprise that would be. Who knows, maybe they’ll write back.

Taking the time to sit and write a letter is a calming exercise. It forces us to stop and to think – what am I going to say? How should I say it? (Quiet reflection right now is a good thing.) It can be creative as well. Many letter writers draw on the paper or decorate with stamps and stickers.

Have I convinced you?

 

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Tools for staying healthy. (Thanks for the mask, Kit.)

Last week I was in the grocery store and noticed that people were going out of their way to keep a “safe” distance from one another. I had to chuckle to myself because that’s a regular practice for me.

The coronavirus or COVID-19 is causing a lot of anxiety. We all know, hopefully, the basics of trying to stay healthy – wash hands often and avoid anyone, as best we can, who is ill. Of course if we’re not feeling well ourselves, COVID-19 or just a cold, we stay home.

But I have some other tips that perhaps haven’t occurred to most people:

  1. Pens: I don’t use a store, restaurant, or bank pen. I carry my own and I usually don’t loan it to strangers but if I do, I tell them to keep it.
  2. Grocery carts/baskets: I haven’t used one of those in years. I put my purchases in the reusable canvas bags I bring with me. If it’s a big grocery shopping trip, then that won’t work so just make sure to wipe the grocery cart handle. Speaking of canvas shopping bags, it’s a good idea to throw them in the wash every so often.
  3. Pubic transportation: For starters, I don’t touch anything. But I also have a dedicated pair of gloves for the task if needed. I spray the gloves with alcohol after each use and keep them in a plastic bag. (I just read that Queen Elizabeth these days is sporting gloves in public. Good for her!) I also refrain from putting my purse or tote bag on the floor or on the seat next to me.
  4. Airplane travel: I’m with Naomi Campbell! I wipe down everything with a disinfectant towel – seat, screen, seat-belt, tray, etc.
  5. Public spaces: What to do in a classroom, conference room, work staff room? Before I sit, I wipe down the seat and table with a disinfectant towel.
  6. When I get home after having been on public transportation, or in any public space where I’ve had to sit, I spray my clothes with alcohol and hang them in the bathroom overnight. Just as as extra precaution.
  7. Finally, I keep hand sanitizer at an easy reach. I have noticed no matter how much I think/plan ahead something unexpected happens. Having the sanitizer in a pocket is helpful. (Such as, after using a store keypad. I hear those are covered with germs.)

This is what I do all the time to avoid colds and the flu and now the dreaded COVID-19. It seems to me that taking precautions during this pubic health crisis is the right thing to do for ourselves, our families, and our communities.

Stay healthy out there!

 

 

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