Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘fashion in literature’

Needle, needle, dip and dart.

Thrusting up and down,

Where’s the man could ease a heart

Like a satin gown?

See the stitches curve and crawl

Round the cunning seams –

Patterns thin and sweet and small

As a lady’s dreams.

Wantons go in bright brocades;

Brides in organdie;

Gingham’s for the plighted maid;

Satin’s for the free!

Wool’s to line a miser’s chest;

Crape’s to calm the old;

Velvet hides an empty breast;

Satin’s for the bold!

Lawn is for a bishop’s yoke;

Linen’s for a nun;

Satin is for the wiser folk –

Would the dress were done!

Satin glows in candlelight –

Satin’s for the proud!

They will say who watch at night,

“What a fine shroud!”

Dorothy Parker (d.1967), American poet. The Satin Dress was published in 1926.

Happy Birthday to Dorothy Parker, born this day in 1893.

Read Full Post »

IMG_20180322_114748Vain trifles as they seem, clothes have. they say, more important offices than merely to keep us warm. They change our view of the world and the world’s view of us. 

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) – English author. This quote is from Ms. Woolf’s 1925 novel, Orlando.

Virginia Woolf’s sense of style was very much of her era and social set – bohemian 1920s. We might call it “effortless elegance” today. She favored long cardigans and printed skirts that draped so nicely on her tall slender figure. She didn’t go with the popular bob hairstyle but instead, staying just askew of fashion, she sported an untidy bun at the nape of the neck. Strands of long beads and fringed shawls were among her accessory choices.

She often referred to clothing in her novels and commented in her diary that “I must remember to write about my clothes …”

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »