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Posts Tagged ‘Harper’s Bazaar’

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Marc Jacobs strikes a pose in Harper’s Bazaar, May 2020. Photo: Zoey Grossman.

I was leaving my shrink one day in a Celine leopard coat and rhinestone hair clips – I was done up. I noticed this sanitation worker staring at me and thought he was a hater, but then he said, ‘Love that outfit, man, you go.’

Marc Jacobs – American fashion designer.

I love that his handbag, by Hermes, has a cup holder.

Marc Jacobs is a controversial designer, but I have always liked him. Often his designs are vintage inspired, which appeals to me.

Word has it that Jacobs has lost his way in fashion. I took a peek online at his spring 2020 show and he’s all over the map. There’s no cohesion to the line, which includes 40s-inspired suits, 70s-style maxi dresses, 60s mini-dresses and some avant-garde dresses a la Balenciaga. All colors, all patterns, shapes, silhouettes are included. Hats run the gamut, too.

In total contradiction, the show itself was minimalist. It took place in a large empty venue with no runway, none of the usual fashion show hoopla. Just the audience and the models, who initially came out all together and walked between and past the audience, reconvened in the back and then came out one at a time, keeping a reasonable pace (nice for journalists and anyone who really wants to see the clothes).

I read that since the shutdown Jacobs has been posting selfies on Instagram. That’s got me wondering what his post-pandemic designs will be like.

 

 

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samiraGreat style is about more than the way we wear our clothes. It is also how we see and occupy space in the world around us.

Samira Nasr, the next editor-in-chief of Harper’s Bazaar.

Last week Hearst Magazines announced that Samira Nasr will take the reigns from Glenda Bailey, who had been the HB editor for 19 years.

Ms. Nasr is the first Black woman to be appointed to such a position in the magazine’s 153 year history. She started her fashion career as an assistant to Grace Coddington at Vogue and she also worked for a time as fashion director for Elle. Most recently Ms. Nasr was the fashion director at Vanity Fair.

Ms. Bailey steps down at HB but she will still walk the hallways of Hearst headquarters working as “global consultant” which, as I understand it, means she will connect (make deals?) fashion marketers with Hearst magazine editors.

Congratulations to Ms. Nasr! As a subscriber to HB, I look forward to something new and exciting.

Farewell to Ms. Bailey, who kept HB alive and thriving during some really challenging times in magazine publishing.

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Silvia Venturini Fendi. Photo: Filippo Bamberghi. Harper’s Bazaar, April 2020.

Karl taught me that time is the best judgement of creativity. I want to make clothes that people wear throughout their lives. 

Silvia Venturini Fendi, creative director at Fendi.

Ms. Fendi has worked at her family’s brand for close to 30 years, having designed the 90s iconic Baguette bag. Last year she became creative director at Fendi after the death of Karl Lagerfeld. He had designed for Fendi for more than 50 years. Impressive!

 

 

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Giorgio Armani. Photo: Serge Leblon

I’ve been away from London for quite some time. The city has changed, I’ve changed, and fashion has changed. But what has stayed the same is my desire to express myself. Because in this rapidly changing world, you can be influenced, dragged in one direction or another, and lose your own identity. But I have eyes and ears; I look around and listen, and I’ve noticed that you wear jeans in a beautiful way, which maybe 10 years ago you wouldn’t have done. 

Giorgio Armani – Italian fashion designer.

This quote is from an interview with Mr. Armani in London conducted by fashion writer Justine Picardie for the October 2017 issue of Harper’s Bazaar.

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Armani couture, Fall 2017. From Harper’s Bazaar. Photo: Serge Leblon.

I just about fell out of my chair when I read that Ms. Picardie wore jeans to interview a fashion legend such as Giorgio Armani.

In parenthesis she describes her outfit – flat ballet pumps, a floral chiffon blouse, and jeans.  I’m sure it was very nice looking, chic even, but still, too casual. How about that blouse with a skirt? Or a suit? Or even a pair of gaberdine trousers?

But as Mr. Armani says things have changed – fashion has changed. We have become more casual, everywhere all the time, especially at work. He points out that 10 years ago Ms. Picardie, a professional journalist working for a top fashion magazine, probably would not even have considered wearing jeans on the job.

Not allowing myself to be “influenced and dragged” into the casual direction, I feel more comfortable dressing professionally (usually in a dress with a blazer or a skirt and blouse) on an interview, at a press preview, or anytime I’m working. That’s me and I’m sticking to it.

 

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March 14, 1896 Harper’s Bazar cover. Illustration by Harry Whitney McVickar

Harper’s Bazaar is celebrating their 150th anniversary in 2017.

Founded in 1867, Harper’s Bazar (spelled back then with one a) was the first American fashion magazine. It was inspired by Der Bazar from Berlin, a general magazine that also covered women’s fashions complete with elaborate woodcut illustrations. Harper & Brothers publishing house in New York picked up on the novel idea of a women’s publication and created their own version.

The magazine’s mission stated at the time was to become “… a vast repository for all the rare and costly things of earth – silks, velvets, cashmeres, spices, perfumes, and glittering gems; in a word, whatever can comfort the heart and delight the eye.”

In addition to fashions and the finer things of life, within the pages of HB could be found fictional stories, poetry, articles on family and work not to mention society and all things good mannered.

But off limits was politics, which must have been a challenge for the publication’s editor Mary Louise Booth, the first women reporter for the New York Times and a women’s rights activist. Still, in 1869 HB was among the few large publications to support the suffrage movement.

Harper’s Bazaar is my favorite fashion magazine. I appreciate its elegant yet modern sensibilities in style and content.

Congratulations Harper’s Bazaar! Here’s to many more years of fashion and all things that matter to women.

 

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201313013523456Elegance is good taste plus a dash of daring.

Carmel Snow (1887-1961). Editor in chief of Harper’s Bazaar from 1934 to 1958.

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Harper’s Bazaar featuring Rihanna, August 2012.

Personal style comes down to choices. And part of what makes fashion so wonderful is how we make pieces our own …

– Glenda Bailey, Editor-in-Chief Harper’s Bazaar

Right on! What I enjoy most about fashion is creating my own style. Every season I take note of what appeals to me in various fashion magazines, including Harper’s Bazaar. Often I tear out pages for future reference. When putting together outfits I keep favorite trends in mind and create my own versions, usually adding elements like a vintage hat or handbag. I learned this from my mother who still flips through magazines imagining how she’d rework a look to suit herself.

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