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Posts Tagged ‘historical fashion in modern fashion’

One of the assignments in the fashion history class I recently completed was to find historical fashion references in current fashion. In magazines I looked for examples covering ancient clothing to the 20th century and matched with historical images from books, plus I had to write a comment.

The late 20th Century: Mini-Dress

late20thC

The simple silhouette, high waist and short hem of Michael Kors design revisits (yet again) the mini-skirt fad of the 1960s. (Additionally Kors use of brocade fabric and jeweled embellishment feels a bit 18th century Baroque.)

Of course I love the matching hat! Plus you can’t see very well, but the mules are made of the same dress fabric. Go matchy, matchy!

This is the final installment of Finding Historical Fashion Today. I hope ODFL readers enjoyed the series. If the stats are any indication, you did.

There will be more historical fashion posts in the future. Stay tuned.

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One of the assignments in the fashion history class I recently completed was to find historical fashion references in current fashion. In magazines I looked for examples covering ancient clothing to the 20th century and matched with historical images from books, plus I had to write a comment.

We’ve reached the 20th century: Blouse and skirt.

 

20thC

Hedi Slimane for Celine is channeling the independent woman of the nineteen-teens. His blouse with high collar, lace, and long sleeves paired with a long simple skirt says college co-ed or suffragette, or both!

20C2

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One of the assignments in the fashion history class I recently completed was to find historical fashion references in current fashion. In magazines I looked for examples covering ancient clothing to the 20th century and matched with historical images from books, plus I had to write a comment.

Gotta love those extreme sleeves of the Late 19th Century.

puffsleeves

Over-sized puffy sleeves on this otherwise simple cotton dress is the descendant of the Leg of Mutton Sleeve, which enjoyed a revival in the 1890s after its debut in the early part of the century.

By the 1890s hoops and bustles were out of fashion. As women were becoming more independent, some fighting for the right to vote, they needed to get around more easily. Simpler skirts paired with shirtwaists (blouses) were the look and when the skirts narrowed, the sleeves expanded.

lom.sleeves

A tailor-made with leg-of-mutton sleeves. c.1895. Image from Survey of Historic Costume (Fairchild Books).

 

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One of the assignments in the fashion history class I recently completed was to find historical fashion references in current fashion. In magazines I looked for examples covering ancient clothing to the 20th century and matched with historical images from books, plus I had to write a comment.

This week we are up to the Early 19th Century: Marie Sleeves.

mariesleeves

 

Louis Vuitton’s pretty puffed sleeves feel very 1820s Romantic. Called Marie Sleeves back in the day, the puffs were created by using tied ribbons. Today, elastic creates the same effect and LV has added touches of lace for good measure.

Come back next week!

 

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One of the assignments in the fashion history class I recently completed was to find historical fashion references in current fashion. In magazines I looked for examples covering ancient clothing to the 20th century and matched with historical images from books, plus I had to write a comment.

This week we have the fluff and frills of the 18th Century Ball Gown.

bg

 

This expansive backside and numerous ruffles makes this gown by Marc Jacobs fit for any Rococo 18th Century royal court. (But this model’s tiny head is calling for a tall wig.)

 

ballgown

More historical fashion next week.

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One of the assignments in the fashion history class I recently completed was to find historical fashion references in current fashion. In magazines I looked for examples covering ancient clothing to the 20th century and matched with historical images from books, plus I had to write a comment.

This week it’s the Trunk Hose from the 16th Century.

 

trunkhose

 

I was excited when I found this modern short skirt. It immediately reminded me of the ever popular men’s Trunk Hose. The precursor to Breeches, Trunk Hose initially were short and puffy, but over time they became longer and more narrow. On top a gentleman wore a Dublet, which was attached to the Trunk Hose with laces (called points) threaded through the waistband.  He sported stockings and soft shoes, later boots. In the early part of the 16th Century, ruffs were all the rage to wear at the neck; by the middle of the century Falling Collars were the thing. Check back next week for more on that.

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One of the assignments in the fashion history class I recently completed was to find historical fashion references in current fashion. In magazines I looked for examples covering ancient clothing to the 20th century and matched with historical images from books, plus I had to write a comment.

Over the next weeks I’m sharing what I found.

 

This week’s historical influence is the Doric Chiton.

chiton

I’m inspired by the simplicity of the Ancient Greek Doric Chiton. I wear long dresses and skirts in summer at home and I find they are cool and comfortable, but not sloppy in certain fabrics. A cotton weave is best.

Clothing in ancient cultures were draped and folded, tied or attached by a T-shape pin called a “peplos pin.”

It’s hard to read my comment above but the modern dress is by Prada, spring 2020. The basic silhouette and ties at the shoulders speak Doric Chiton to me.

Tune in next week for another post on Finding Historical Fashion Today.

 

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One of the assignments in the fashion history class I recently completed was to find historical fashion references in current fashion. In magazines I looked for examples covering ancient clothing to the 20th century and matched with historical images from books, plus I had to write a comment.

I hopped right on it and started looking when the class began in January and it took me pretty much the whole semester. It wasn’t something you could get done in one sitting (I think that some of the other students might have tried). It was old-school cut and paste and I really had fun with it.

I’m going to share my findings with ODFL readers over the next weeks. First up is the Schenti:

FH1

Tune in again next week.

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