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Posts Tagged ‘men’s fashion’

One of the assignments in the fashion history class I recently completed was to find historical fashion references in current fashion. In magazines I looked for examples covering ancient clothing to the 20th century and matched with historical images from books, plus I had to write a comment.

This week it’s the Trunk Hose from the 16th Century.

 

trunkhose

 

I was excited when I found this modern short skirt. It immediately reminded me of the ever popular men’s Trunk Hose. The precursor to Breeches, Trunk Hose initially were short and puffy, but over time they became longer and more narrow. On top a gentleman wore a Dublet, which was attached to the Trunk Hose with laces (called points) threaded through the waistband.  He sported stockings and soft shoes, later boots. In the early part of the 16th Century, ruffs were all the rage to wear at the neck; by the middle of the century Falling Collars were the thing. Check back next week for more on that.

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Figure left: Early 18th century three piece suits made of the same fabric were called Ditto Suits. Figure right: Three different style banyans in the late 18th century. Both images from Survey of Historic Costume by Phyllis Tortora, 5th ed., Fairchild Books.

I never thought I’d say this, but while studying fashion history I have been just as, if not more, interested in men’s fashions as women’s. Men’s fashions from the 15th through the 18th centuries are fascinating for their silhouettes, layers, and extensive decoration.

In the 18th century men were sporting a shirt with breeches, a waistcoat (vest), and a narrow coat –  all in beautiful sometimes embroidered fabrics. But at home the coat was hung away and replaced with the banyan. This loosely fit garment was what we might think of as a robe or dressing gown.

Called “undress at home” the look was more relaxed yet still fit for company and portraits. Some fabrics used for banyans included Indian cotton, silk, velvet, or brocade and often gentlemen topped the ensemble with a nightcap and perhaps toasted the evening with the other kind of nightcap.

How are we doing out there? Holding on OK? I hope so.

Remember to Keep Calm and Keep Your Distance.

 

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IMG_20190429_170819383If you’ve got belt loops on a trouser, wear a belt. Otherwise, it looks like you forgot. The only exception: jeans. Wear a fresh white shirt with a pair of jeans and loafers or driving moccasins. You will feel like Robert Redford. 

Joseph Abboud, menswear fashion designer.

I would say the same for women – belt loops cry out for a belt! And yes, a crisp white shirt with jeans is a winner on everyone.

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downloadI was in Silicon Valley and with a lot of senior, grown-up people, not the Millennials. I was out there for a couple of days and it just struck me that they didn’t see it, but they all dressed exactly alike – they all wear jeans, they all wear navy blazers, they all wear shirts without ties. If you’re a multi-million-dollar-a-year Silicon Valley executive, you dress like a civilian because you’re wearing jeans, but you’re wearing $2,000 brown Italian shoes … that’s how you express your individuality. 

Leslie H. Wexner, CEO L Brands.

This quote is from an interview Mr. Wexner did with WWD, June 2016.

Jeans? How depressing. At least the older guys are wearing blazers – I bet the younger ones are not. Still, it’s a look that, for me, does not inspire any confidence and I certainly don’t find it attractive. I like an executive to look like an executive, not a “civilian.” I know that suits these days are dated, but there must be some way to balance a professional look with modern lifestyles. But really, at the office no sneakers! No jeans! Please guys, dress like a grown-up, not like your ten-year-old son.

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Pocket Square

It doesn’t have to be perfect, it just has to be there.

Roberto Isola speaking about the all important pocket square at the Art Deco Society of California’s recent lecture on men’s vintage fashions. Roberto and his wife, Jula, are experts in vintage fashions and run their own business, City Vintage Clothing.

From their studio in South San Francisco, the Isolas work with men and women to create vintage ensembles for parties, weddings, and various period events, including the upcoming ADSC’s Gatsby Summer Afternoon.

Thanks, Roberto for doing your part to help our fellas look their best.

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