Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘pandemic 2020’

quoteBecause for me – always, but now more than ever – the human has to be at the center of the process. In these past decades, we’ve talked a lot about numbers – the first, the best. And in a way, this has created a kind of competition that I don’t think you really need. You can forget about creativity and the humanity because it’s all about money and marketing. And that’s not what fashion is for. Fashion is about dreaming, inspiring.

Pierpaolo Piccioli, Creative Director at Valentino.

This quote is from a discussion in Harper’s Bazaar  with designers about what’s important to them right now during these challenging times. (Summer, 2020)

The reason fashion has become more about numbers than people is because many of the houses are now owned by big corporations. It’s not a designer running his own house anymore, it’s a celebrity designer paid a lot of money to produce and produced and produced … until he’s used up and another one is put in place and so on. (Think Alexander McQueen, John Galliano, Alber Albaz).

Fashion cannot thrive without imagination and imagination needs time and space to develop.

 

Read Full Post »

outfitaday.2

I’m a big fan of skirts. Worn with a t-shirt or light cotton blouse, a skirt is easy and comfortable yet still a nice look.

Skirts are a go-to option for my At Home Attire ensembles. I made the one in this photo from a novelty print (ferns) cotton fabric. I’ve paired it with a cotton t-shirt in gray and added a cropped cardigan in light green, which picks up the lighter green shade in the skirt. The shoes are patent leather ballet flats, which are as comfortable as slippers!

Notice I’m wearing jewelry. Just because I’m hanging at home, doesn’t mean I’m not putting on some bling. Rings are my favorite and I enjoy looking at them while pausing at my writing desk, searching for just the right word or taking a break to stretch.

Tune in again for another installment of At Home Attire.

Read Full Post »

thumbnail (4)Since staying put at home, I started pulling out some of my vintage pieces that I would only wear to an event. Because they are delicate or not as easy to move around in on pubic transport or walking to and from destinations, much of my vintage wardrobe gets only the occasional outing. But earlier in the pandemic I was showing up once a week to my fashion history class in front of my laptop – no BART rides, no long walks – so why not sport some vintage?

This pictured outfit includes a linen skirt that is easy to wear staying in place at my desk, but not running around. The Oxford shoes are not vintage, but they look very 1930s and are fine for the few steps to my desk at home, however, they would be horribly uncomfortable walking eight city blocks from BART to class.

On the shoulder of the lightweight cotton sweater, I’m wearing a silk flower from Britex Fabrics. The silk turban style hat is a favorite from Kiss of the Wolf. 

Now the socks are their own story. I’ve always had a thing for interesting socks and I found these two-tone bobby socks at Molly B in Berkeley. Made in Japan, they were ridiculously expensive, but they are high quality and unique. I like the stripe and the odd color combination.

Check back for more At Home Attire.

 

 

Read Full Post »

Like many other happenings this pandemic year, Gatsby Summer Afternoon has been cancelled. This annual event, always held the second Sunday in September at the picturesque Dunsmuir Mansion in Oakland, is produced by the Art Deco Society of California and is one of the most popular period costume gatherings of the year. It attracts close to one thousand attendees all dressed in attire appropriate to the Art Deco era, 1920s-1940s.

To forgo this favorite event is disappointing, but safety is a priority! So, while we stay safe at home how about a visual revisit to Gatsby Summer Afternoons of the past?

We all look forward to gathering again in person hopefully next year. Save the date: Sunday, September 12, 2021.

This just in: The ADSC has announced a virtual version of Gatsby Summer Afternoon, complete with the usual contests and photo ops. Click here for the full scoop.

UPDATE: Due to unhealthy air quality, the virtual Gatsby Summer Afternoon has been rescheduled for next weekend, September 19-20, 2020.

Read Full Post »

What I call At Home Attire is clothing that I wear at home that is comfortable, but not sloppy. Something that I wouldn’t mind an unexpected visitor seeing.

Long dresses are the perfect at-home attire because they’re easy, cool in the summer, and fall somewhere between the restrictions of street wear and the casualness of athleisure.

This long cotton dress by Isaac Mizrahi is comfortable, yet presentable. I wouldn’t wear it out, but add heels and an up-do with perhaps a flower and it’s just the thing for casual summer entertaining (in pre-pandemic days).

I like combining various shades of green, so on this day I paired the dress with a green cotton cardigan from Boden. The dress is sleeveless and sometimes I wear a white t-shirt underneath; the pop of white works well with the dark green.

Stay tuned for more At Home Attire.

Read Full Post »

ACC

One of the many disappointments this year due to the pandemic was the cancellation of the American Craft Council show usually held at San Francisco’s Fort Mason in August. But as they say, The Show Must Go On and on it will …

The ACC show gathers top craftspeople from around the country (many are from the Bay Area) to exhibit and sell their wares, which includes one-of a kind jewelry, clothing, gifts, and home décor. Instead of showing in person, the ACC has worked hard to shift to a virtual show called San Francisco Bay Area Craft Week, running September 7-13, 2020; there will be an online marketplace where shoppers can see available crafts as well as “visit” artists’ studios, their hometowns, hear their stories, hear their playlists, see artists at work and more.

Participants include:

Kiss of the Wolf (women’s hand-painted clothing –   my sis-in-law!)

Modern Shibori (clothing, local)

Audrey Modern (handbags)

Scott Wynn (furniture)

Sam Woehrman (jewelry, local)

There will be 130 artists in all. I don’t know about you, but I’m already thinking about the holidays and wondering what the heck I’m going to do about gifts. ACC and these participating artists are here to help. And perhaps part of gift-giving this year will be supporting artists who really need our help as much as we need them!

“It’s an opportunity for everyone to ‘travel’ and discover in a time of physical distancing. We believe the creative diversity of object making, craft, and design in the San Francisco Bay Area is a wonderful way to launch this new program,” says Sarah Schultz, American Craft Council, executive director.
Mark your calendars, make your lists, and tune in September 7-13. Click here for more information. 

Read Full Post »

grand.ma

That’s me and my grandmother, she looking lovely in her caftan.

I recently attended a Webinar discussion on the future of fashion during the pandemic with a panel of women who work in the business; one panelist mentioned that she thought entertaining at home was going to be a trend.  She predicted that by next year designers will have a dedicated line of at home wear.

I think she’s on to something and I’m reminded of my stylish grandmother. When she was elderly and could no longer go out, at home every day she donned colorful caftans and leather mules. (She also still dyed her short pixie-cut hair and had regular manicures – up until she died at age 84.)

caf

Caftans by Stella McCartney, Fall 2020 as seen in Harper’s Bazaar. 

My wardrobe includes items that are what I call, At Home Attire. In pre-pandemic days, I would change out of street clothes when I got home and slip into “something more comfortable,” which might be a pair of silky pajamas or a long cotton dress. Now that I’m spending more time at home, I’m inspired by my grandmother and I try to make an effort to look presentable every day.

Over the next few weeks, I’ll share some of my newly created outfits. Stay tuned.

 

Read Full Post »

britex

There aren’t that many independent stores left … It’s not just about Union Square, but everywhere in the country. If people want specialty, creative businesses to survive, people have to support those businesses. We’re not going to survive unless people come out to support us … It’s amazing how many people will come to the door and say we love that you’re still in business … They’ll say you’re the same people who served my grandmother 30 years ago, my mother 20 years ago.

Gary Angel, San Francisco attorney.

This quote is from an article by Alyssa Pereira in the San Francisco Chronicle, August 12, 2020. Click here for the full article. 

Mr. Angel is married to Sharman Spector, the second generation proprietor of Britex fabric store in downtown San Francisco.

Britex is heaven for those of us who love textiles, sewing, and fashion. The most beautiful of fabrics and notions from around the world are stacked and hung and artfully displayed within the two story Britex store on Post Street. Not only that, but this family-run business has been a part of San Francisco history for 68 years.

When Covid-19 hit and California shut down, the downtown shop shifted to online sales. Now they offer curbside pickup. But for them and all small businesses everywhere, it’s challenging.

I agree with Mr. Angel, that it’s up to us to support small businesses as much as we can. And when it comes to fabrics, we really don’t want to lose one of the few quality fabric stores left in the Bay Area.

Not long after the shutdown I was working on a project and I desperately needed a particular sewing notion to continue. Britex came to the rescue! I shopped online and had the tool in my mailbox within a week. I really appreciate that quick and friendly service.

How about a sewing project? Masks anyone? Britex is selling kits, which includes all you need to make six masks. Visit online: https://www.britexfabrics.com/

Thank you, Britex. You are a San Francisco treasure!

Read Full Post »

ghgh

Spotted in a local neighborhood window. It’s not a great photo, but it is a great message.

Everyone looks great in a mask because wearing a mask says: I respect myself and my community. I’m doing what I need to do to stay safe and keep those around me safe, too. 

It’s as simple as that.

Read Full Post »

The Tear Dress by Elsa Schiaparelli.

 

In difficult times fashion is always outrageous. 

Elsa Schiaparelli (1890-1973), Italian born fashion designer.

Schiaparelli is my favorite designer of all time. Known for her collaboration with Surreal artist Salvador Dali, Schiaparelli designs were unique and fanciful and very much of the Art Deco era.  She turned the shape of a shoe into a hat and circus animals became buttons.

In this quote I wonder if Schiaparelli means that the idea of fashion during challenging times is outrageous. Or is she saying that fashion itself is (or should be) outrageous during such times.

Let’s go with the latter, and if it’s true then 2020 should see some extreme fashion, like the Schiaparelli dress pictured above. The Tear dress was part of the designer’s Circus Collection for summer 1938. The printed image on the delicate fabric is of cut skin reveling dark red blood underneath. There are actual slashes in the mantle worn over the head (pictured above left), which reminds me of the popularity of slashed fabrics during the 16th century.

Judith Watt says of the dress in her book Vogue on Elsa Schiaparelli (Quadrille Publishing, 2012), “The Tear dress remains a singularly hostile work … Taken out of political context in which General Franco was to seize complete power in Spain and Hitler was poised to annex Czechoslovakia and Austria, its meaning and impact is lost.”

Hostile garb for hostile times. What do we wear to reflect our current state of outrage?

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »