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Posts Tagged ‘Sylvia Plath’

Like Esther in the novel The Bell Jar and perhaps author Sylvia Plath too, I’m also impressed with the idea of matching handbag dress/skirt/anything. Although, I know it’s a little too “put together” these days, that does not stop me.

I have two skirts with matching handbags that I made myself. One I made last year with a matching mask as well. I like the “matchy-matchy” look because it’s unexpected and the repetition of pattern and color appeals to me.

The first matchy-matchy that caught my eye was way back when I was maybe four-years-old; my mother had a summer outfit – a red and white gingham dress and a light blue coat with the same gingham fabric lining. I remember that outfit so well and the matching part has inspired me ever since.

How about other matches? My sis-in-law made for me a matching cap and cross-body bag (thanks, Lori). I have a beautiful bespoke outfit – 1920s style coat with a matching skirt and a blouse that matches the lining of the coat.

There are many ways to match: hat with handbag, handbag with shoes, dress with lining of coat, hat with jacket. How about socks with scarf? OK, now I’m getting silly.

Matchy-matchy gets a bad rap as does any look that’s too put together because being fashionable is supposed to also be effortless. Hmm, how does that work?

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Sylvia Plath

Her college was so fashion conscious, she said, that all the girls had pocketbook covers made out of the same material as their dresses, so each time they changed their clothes they had a matching pocketbook. This kind of detail impressed me. It suggested a whole life of marvelous, elaborate decadence that attracted me like a magnet.

Esther Greenwood – fictional character from The Bell Jar, by Sylvia Plath (1932-1963).

I imagine many of ODFL readers are familiar with this book. Published in 1963 under a pseudonym, The Bell Jar is the fictionalized story of Ms. Plath’s time in early 1950s New York City where she worked as one of the guest editors of Mademoiselle magazine, although, in the book the magazine name was changed along with the names of central characters. Known for her poetry, this was Ms. Plath’s only novel. She died in 1963 of suicide.

Check back tomorrow for more on matching accessories.

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