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Posts Tagged ‘textile design’

The pandemic has hit hard in all areas of life, but particularly restaurants, shops, theaters, and museums.

One of my favorite visits when I’m in London is the Fashion and Textile Museum located south of the Thames River in Bermondsey. Founded by fashion designer Dame Zandra Rhodes in 2003, FTM is now run by Newham College and offers unique fashion and textile exhibits, as well as workshops and classes. (I was privileged to view 1920s Jazz Age and write about it for Vintage Life Magazine.)

They even offer Events on Demand – for a small fee (5 pounds or approximately $7) you can watch recorded interviews and tours of exhibits.

As the only museum in the UK dedicated to featuring contemporary textile and fashion design, FTM is a rare and necessary resource for education and inspiration.

Unfortunately since March of 2020, they have lost more than 80 percent of their income and the future of the museum is “uncertain.” Yikes! FTM needs our help and to that end they have set up a crowdfunding campaign. Please consider making a donation to FTM. Any donation will help. And then put this fabulous museum on your Must Visit List when next in London.

Not familiar with FTM? You’re in for a treat. Click here.

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imagesCA4MX0JAA pattern designer should know all about the craft for which he has to draw.

– William Morris, English textile designer, artist, writer and socialist (1834-1896)

I was quite taken with William Morris after my recent visit to the William Morris Gallery in Walthamstow, a district of east London. Recently renovated, the 1840s mansion where Morris lived tells the story of the Victorian renaissance man.

williammorris460Mr. Morris is mostly known for his textile designs. With several partners he opened a decorative arts firm in 1861 and soon became popular with London’s bohemian crowd including Oscar Wilde. In 1861 Mr. Morris was commissioned to decorate the Green Dining Room of the South Kensington Museum, now known as the Morris Room in the Victoria & Albert Museum.

Click here to learn more about William Morris.

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