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Posts Tagged ‘The Business of Fashion’

magsOn social media, fashion executives have expressed their solidarity for Black lives by posting black squares and sharing PR statements promising to do better on behalf of their companies. But how much value do these promises hold when Black interns at a prominent fashion magazine have yet to see themselves represented at all levels of the masthead?  

… Tokenism cannot be the antidote to racism and lack of representation in the workplace. In addition to hiring Black people, structural transformation must also be implemented to support and make way for upward mobility. It’s never been enough to sprinkle us on covers or on runways; there needs to be a pipeline in place that allows for Black talent to graduate to leadership roles. Because of systemic barriers in place, we are often beset with a premature disillusionment with the industry, questioning our place and purpose.

Jasmine Burgos, Abigail Cherubin, & Christopher Akintonde – Former fashion magazine interns.

This quote is from an op-ed in Business of Fashion. Click here for the full piece.

I have wondered about all the recent social media statements by corporations. How meaningful are they? Perhaps it’s a place to start but, I agree that real change has to happen beyond mere statements.

Harper’s Bazaar has appointed their first Black editor. Samira Nasr steps into the role in July. It’s an interesting time for her, for the fashion industry, for the world.

Here’s hoping we are finally inspired to do better.

 

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wethepeople

The fashion industry has always been a reflection of what America is all about … inclusion and diversity. It will continue to stand by these standards. I am personally horrified to see what is going on.

– Diane von Furstenberg, Belgium-American fashion designer.

This quote is from an article in The Business of Fashion by Imran Amed.

For Mr. Amed’s article many fashion industry professionals were asked to comment on Trump’s recent executive order to halt the current refugee program and (temporarily) ban travelers from seven Muslim countries from entering the United States. Ms. von Furstenberg and Steven Kolb, chief executive of CFDA were the only ones willing to make a comment. Others declined to say one word.

Isn’t that rather odd considering the outrage expressed around the country and around the world? CEOs from Apple, Facebook, Starbucks, and Nike just to name a few, are all unafraid to take a public stand against Trump’s actions.

Why so quiet on the fashion front? I surmise that (assuming most designers actually disagree with Trump) they might be afraid to alienate Trump supporters, many of whom could be their customers. Let’s not forget that Kellyanne Conway was sporting Gucci at the inauguration. Brands such as Isaac Mizrahi and Lori Goldstein sell on QVC, a magnet for middle-of-the country shoppers. Also, Trump’s daughter, Ivanka is an influential member of the fashion biz.

It could be that designers and corporate brands are nervous about offending all the wrong people (customers and Trumps). If they say nothing, they’re safe.

But SAFE is not fashionable right now. SPEAKING UP is what’s trending.

 

 

 

 

 

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… only a small fraction of American consumers are willing to pay premium prices for US-made apparel. The majority of consumers think of fast fashion, discount retailers, dollar stores and coupons when it comes to purchasing clothing. Country of origin is simply not top of mind.

– Edward Hertzman, publisher of  Sourcing Journal, an apparel and textiles supply chain trade journal.

This quote is taken from Mr. Hertzman’s Op-Ed – Made in America is More Hype than Reality published in The Business of Fashion.

Well, I am one consumer that is willing to pay more for American made fashions as well as other products. But my whole approach to shopping for fashion has shifted – I buy less, often it’s vintage, and I sometimes have my clothes made. I believe a lot of people are considering the origins of what they wear and buy, but perhaps not enough.

 

 

 

 

 

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