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Posts Tagged ‘twelve days of Christmas’

This lovely Corde’ handbag is one of several that I own. Popular in the 1940s, Corde’ bags were made from rows of gimp (cord used for trim in clothing and furniture) stitched in interesting patterns to fabric backing. The inside label says “A Genuine Corde’ Registered Trademark. Made in England.”

I add a tulle bow for festive holiday outings.

A gift from my mother, I don’t save this handbag for just vintage events; I use it often for special occasions and evenings out. It holds quite a lot and the handle is just long enough to slip over my shoulder, which updates the look.

Tomorrow we come to the final day of The Twelve Days of Vintage Handbags. Don’t miss it!

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For our final vintage handbag of the series I present this lovely gold mesh evening bag by Whiting and Davis.

Most vintage enthusiasts have a Whiting and Davis in their collection and mine came to me from my grandmother. It’s in such excellent condition I can hardly believe it dates from the 1930s.

The Whiting and Davis plant in MA, c.1920.

Whiting and Davis was the leading manufacturer of mesh handbags after the company patented mesh making machines in 1912. Located in Norfolk, MA the main American plant designed and constructed dozens of different patterns from painted mesh to enamel to silver or gold plate.

In 1966 the company sold but it’s still around today, still making mesh bags that sell at high-end stores for upwards of $200.

My gold Whiting and Davis mesh evening bag was the perfect choice for the ADSC 2016 Preservation Ball.

I often sport my vintage W&D at Art Deco evening events such as the ADSC Preservation Ball. I look forward to using it again, hopefully later this year.

And with that, we are at the end of The Twelve Days of Vintage Handbags. I hope readers have enjoyed the holiday series as much as I have. There will be another one next season. Hmm … what will it be? Stay with us this year and find out.

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This one was among my first and best purchases while I was still a college student. At that time there was a vintage shop called Emporium located on Campus Corner near the university. My friend and I would go in regularly and I also tended to stop by on my way home from classes. I was pretty broke in college so I had to be careful but, when I saw this clutch I didn’t hesitate. I don’t even recall how much I paid but I do remember that this shop was very reasonable with their pricing.

The bag is from the 1920s, made of leather with whip stitching on the edges and gold metal inserts. Inside there are several different size pockets, including one just the right size for business cards. (There are still a few of my cards tucked into that pocket as I had a small business making brooches and bolos out of vintage buttons and watch faces.) It expands to hold surprisingly quite a lot and I really like the option of using the strap at the top. It was and still is in excellent condition.

I used it often back then for evenings out to plays (I reviewed plays and movies for the college newspaper) or dinner. It was just the right touch to make an outfit pop.

We are rolling along and tomorrow is day eleven. What will our handbag be? Come back to find out.

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One year I was in London over my birthday. On that day when I returned from some fun British adventure, there was a package at my door. Oh my! A surprise birthday package. I was thrilled when I opened the box and found this collectible handbag. Made of metal and plastic, these structured box bags were very popular in the 1950s.

The thoughtful gift was from my sis-in-law. She timed it just right for the international package to arrive on my birthday. (Thanks, Lori.) I brought it home and it sits on top of my vanity, holding favorite pieces of jewelry.

Check back tomorrow for another peek into my collection.

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That’s me sporting a white patent leather handbag and that’s my mother and my grandmother Louise, two women who sparked my interest in fashion.

A couple of years ago I started a new holiday ODFL tradition: The Twelve Days of Christmas. Starting on Christmas Day through January 5th, I posted a different holiday card. Last year for Twelve Days I posted a different subway advertisement, inspired by a visit to the NYC Transport Museum.

This year the theme is … wait for it … Vintage Handbags.

My interest (obsession) in handbags goes way back to childhood, as soon as I was old enough to covet my mother’s handbags. By age four I was collecting my own and to this day I remember every one. In particular, a fuchsia patent leather structured handbag that my Grandmother Mary bought for me at the Emporium. I remember spotting it on a table lined with navy blue, black, and tan bags. The fuchsia bag stood out and that was the one for me!

To my young self, handbags represented grown up ladies and independence. They were portable spaces holding important things like car keys, front door keys, money, lipstick, gum!

Handbags have been coming my way ever since. I have a collection of antique and vintage bags, many of which I inherited from both of my grandmothers. Starting Christmas Day I will share some of my favorites.

Please tune in starting December 25th for The Twelve Days of Vintage Handbags.

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On the twelfth day of Christmas my true love gave to me … 

 

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… a good laugh. 

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On the eleventh day of Christmas my true love gave to me … 

 

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… a man in an Oxford shirt. 

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On the tenth day of Christmas my true love gave to me … 

 

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… a world’s fair. 

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On the ninth day of Christmas my true love gave to me … 

 

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… a lesson on good manners. 

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On the eighth day of Christmas my true love gave to me … 

 

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… a new hair color? No thanks! I’m happy with my life as a redhead. 

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