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Posts Tagged ‘vintage handbags’

This lovely Corde’ handbag is one of several that I own. Popular in the 1940s, Corde’ bags were made from rows of gimp (cord used for trim in clothing and furniture) stitched in interesting patterns to fabric backing. The inside label says “A Genuine Corde’ Registered Trademark. Made in England.”

I add a tulle bow for festive holiday outings.

A gift from my mother, I don’t save this handbag for just vintage events; I use it often for special occasions and evenings out. It holds quite a lot and the handle is just long enough to slip over my shoulder, which updates the look.

Tomorrow we come to the final day of The Twelve Days of Vintage Handbags. Don’t miss it!

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For our final vintage handbag of the series I present this lovely gold mesh evening bag by Whiting and Davis.

Most vintage enthusiasts have a Whiting and Davis in their collection and mine came to me from my grandmother. It’s in such excellent condition I can hardly believe it dates from the 1930s.

The Whiting and Davis plant in MA, c.1920.

Whiting and Davis was the leading manufacturer of mesh handbags after the company patented mesh making machines in 1912. Located in Norfolk, MA the main American plant designed and constructed dozens of different patterns from painted mesh to enamel to silver or gold plate.

In 1966 the company sold but it’s still around today, still making mesh bags that sell at high-end stores for upwards of $200.

My gold Whiting and Davis mesh evening bag was the perfect choice for the ADSC 2016 Preservation Ball.

I often sport my vintage W&D at Art Deco evening events such as the ADSC Preservation Ball. I look forward to using it again, hopefully later this year.

And with that, we are at the end of The Twelve Days of Vintage Handbags. I hope readers have enjoyed the holiday series as much as I have. There will be another one next season. Hmm … what will it be? Stay with us this year and find out.

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This one was among my first and best purchases while I was still a college student. At that time there was a vintage shop called Emporium located on Campus Corner near the university. My friend and I would go in regularly and I also tended to stop by on my way home from classes. I was pretty broke in college so I had to be careful but, when I saw this clutch I didn’t hesitate. I don’t even recall how much I paid but I do remember that this shop was very reasonable with their pricing.

The bag is from the 1920s, made of leather with whip stitching on the edges and gold metal inserts. Inside there are several different size pockets, including one just the right size for business cards. (There are still a few of my cards tucked into that pocket as I had a small business making brooches and bolos out of vintage buttons and watch faces.) It expands to hold surprisingly quite a lot and I really like the option of using the strap at the top. It was and still is in excellent condition.

I used it often back then for evenings out to plays (I reviewed plays and movies for the college newspaper) or dinner. It was just the right touch to make an outfit pop.

We are rolling along and tomorrow is day eleven. What will our handbag be? Come back to find out.

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This beaded beauty was a gift from a friend of mine. It dates from the 1940s and comes with a mirror and a glasses case. I have worn it many times for an evening of dancing or an elegant dinner out. The beads give off just a bit of sparkle in dim light.

There are a few of my handbags that I use as decoration and this is one of them. It’s a piece of sartorial sculpture and way too pretty to keep in a closet.

Tomorrow is another day with another vintage handbag. Come back!

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This shimmery gold 1960s clutch says, “Take me to a New Year’s Eve cocktail party!”

Local Bay Area vintage fashion enthusiasts might remember a little shop called Madam Butterfly, located on College Avenue in Oakland. That’s where I found this evening bag on sale right before the proprietor went out of business.

The inside label says Gaymode, which was a mid-century handbag manufacturer that specialized in raffia and other fabric bags. This is such an elegant yet simple clutch, just the right style touch for an evening out. But of course, there are no evenings out this pandemic New Years Eve.

Still, wishing all ODFL readers a Happy New Year. Keep it safe and celebrate at home so we’re all here this time next year.

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This fabric handbag hails from the UK. I purchased the satchel at an antique market in London for 20 pounds, which at that time was about $40. It’s another one of my faves for the style and the fact that the emblem on the front looks a bit like the initial M. In excellent condition, it’s all leather inside and has a label that reads: Made in Italy exclusively for D. Henry. I did a little research on D. Henry and unfortunately came up with nothing. I’m not sure of the era but I suspect 1960s going for a retro look. It’s an unusual handbag regardless.

I sport it with some of my vintage outfits but I also wear it with a casual dress or skirt if the colors are compatible. I’m a big fan of mixing vintage with modern.

Here I am sporting this handbag with my mother at at 1920s ADSC event, circa 1996.

Come back tomorrow for a vintage handbag that’s just the thing for New Year’s Eve.

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Here’s another handbag that I think a modern designer might find inspiring. I bought it for $20 at a flea market in Brooklyn.

There’s no inside label but it’s a nicely made 1960s foldover bag – simple in its construction and style. What sets it off, of course, is the brass accent piece. I used to shy away from navy blue, but now I find I like the off color and I have no qualms about mixing it with black.

Tune in again tomorrow for another vintage handbag. What will it be???

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I bought this bag at a vintage show from dealer Jula Isola (City Vintage). A structured style with faux fur, this bag hails from the 1960s.

Modern designers sometimes take inspiration from vintage handbags and I can see this one lining the shelves of a Kate Spade boutique. Large and roomy, I use this bag for special lunches or tea out with friends (when we could do that) or daytime holiday celebrations. It will have to stay inside my closet this winter but I look forward to sporting it again in the future.

Come back tomorrow to see the next vintage handbag.

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This favorite evening bag was a gift from an old friend. I love the dark dark blue and in velvet it’s perfect for the holidays, although I carry it whenever I like – day or evening, anytime of year. The handle is just long enough to tuck the bag under my arm.

Inside is lined with a satin-like fabric and I love the little pocket piped in gold and there’s an extra pocket just right for a lipstick. The label says EST 1933 Princess. I did a little research but so far, I have found nothing. I’m thinking the vintage of this charming bag is circa 1940s.

Stop by again tomorrow for day four of The Twelve Days of Vintage Handbags.

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One year I was in London over my birthday. On that day when I returned from some fun British adventure, there was a package at my door. Oh my! A surprise birthday package. I was thrilled when I opened the box and found this collectible handbag. Made of metal and plastic, these structured box bags were very popular in the 1950s.

The thoughtful gift was from my sis-in-law. She timed it just right for the international package to arrive on my birthday. (Thanks, Lori.) I brought it home and it sits on top of my vanity, holding favorite pieces of jewelry.

Check back tomorrow for another peek into my collection.

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