Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for July, 2018

IMG_20180715_124859

Photo: ANDRES KUDACKI

I tell my daughters, ‘Anyone can put on a dress. It’s your mind that defines you.’

Angelina Jolie – American actress.

This quote is from a Q&A with Ms. Jolie and John Kerry, US Secretary of State 2013-2017, published in Elle magazine, March 2018.

I absolutely agree! But, I also think that what we chose to wear does say something about who we are.

 

Read Full Post »

 

IMG_20171218_160621

#overdressed4life

Read Full Post »

SF_R_Instagram_1_preview

One of my favorite summer events is the American Craft Council Show, which is happening this year on August 3-5 at the Festival Pavilion, Fort Mason in San Francisco. The ACC is a juried show with more than 250 fine artists from around the country gathered to show and sell their wares: one-of-a-kind jewelry, clothing, gifts, fine art, and home décor.

Over the three days there are also various interesting activities including something called Style Slam. Here’s how it works: four local stylists shop the show and put together two looks, demonstrating how unique handmade pieces can work into any wardrobe.

One of the chosen stylists, Kristen Ikeda-Jones is a fashion designer with 25 years experience in San Francisco and around the Bay Area.

Kristen was nice enough to take a little time with ODFL for a Q&A.

Have you attended an ACC show? What are you expectations? 

This will be my very first ACC show.  I am so excited to be one of the four stylists invited to participate in this awesome event!  I’m looking forward to networking with artisans and designers in such a positive environment that promotes beautifully handcrafted wearable goods.  I can’t wait to meet other creative minds to collaborate with and I am eager to find local designers that I can promote and carry in my studio/salon slated to open next spring/summer in the East Bay.  I await the inspiration that I know will influence my capsule collection coming this Fall ’18.

With your impressive background in design and styling, what will you look for in putting your Style Slams ensembles together?

I plan on utilizing my extensive career in design and styling to help with the fast-paced time restraints we will have when pulling our looks together. I will be searching for top level craftsmanship along with the perfect subtle detail to set a piece apart.  The exact thing that sets ikedajones apart – an interesting hem line, a unique, one of a kind textile or color, a subtle twist where you least expect it ….  I love to find a creative but cohesive mix of masculine and feminine and will strive to showcase my point of view.

How do you see the unique wearable arts pieces available at the ACC show blending with more mainstream fashions?

I believe that less is more, but that doesn’t mean you won’t make an impression. When I design a collection or style a client I love to mix perfect go-to “staples” with a piece that stands out and makes a statement.  Make people’s heads turn.  The amazing designs created by the artisans at the ACC show are the perfect blend with everyday, wearable pieces because they can elevate and make your look special and unique in a way nothing found in a department store can. One unique piece can transform your everyday skinny jean, for example. You are wearing not only a one-of-a-kind piece, but you are showcasing a work of art that sets you apart from everyone else, who are settling for yoga pants!

 

I like how you think, Kristen: less is more, detail, make a statement. I’m excited to see your looks at Style Slam.

The American Craft Council Show happens here only once a year. Don’t miss the opportunity to shop for the best in all things unique.

Click here for more information about the ACC show.

 Be there or be SQUARE!

Read Full Post »

b7Muru9GenGwNB_Z

Zack Pinsent. Photo: BBC

Why dress up in jeans and a t-shirt if you can go along to Tesco dressed as Napoleon or something?

Zack Pinsent, British tailor who specializes in Regency period clothing.

Zack dresses full time in period clothing. He’s a part of a new BBC television show, My Friend Jane, which is all about modern day fans of Jane Austen.

Speaking of period clothing, later this week I am on my way to Costume College. For the very first time I’ll be joining the ranks of other period clothing enthusiasts for three days of fashion history lectures and workshops such as:

  • Making the Phantom Bustle
  • 18th Century Coat Construction
  • How to Set an Authentic 16th Century Ruff

… just to mention a few.

I am most interested in fashion history so I’ll be headed to the lecture classes. I’m looking forward to learning about 18th century fabrics, changes in women’s fashions 1774-1784, Hanbok – modern historical Korean dress, and much much more!

Costume College is an annual “costuming arts conference” brought to us by Costumer’s Guild West, Inc.

You can be sure I’ll be writing about this and posting on Instagram.

Follow along #overdressed4life.

Read Full Post »

IMG_20180629_190058

Learn about the complex history of the Kashmir shawl at The Boteh Kashmir & Paisley exhibit on now at Lacis Museum of Lace and Textiles.

IMG_20180629_183815612Featured in this unassuming display are examples of both hand and machine woven shawls popular in Europe during the 18th and 19th centuries. The common shawl motif we know as paisley was originally referred to as boteh, a Persian word that means bush or shrub. Shawls began to appear in the eleventh century made from the fine underbelly hairs of the Himalayan goat. Using a twill weave, each shawl was handwoven and could take up to three years to complete.

In the 1700s these shawls became prized objects  when Kashmir royalty gifted them to occupying British officials. The fashion for Kashmir (cashmere) shawls among the wealthy in Britain and Europe created a demand impossible to fulfill.

Fast forward to the early 1800s when the Jacquard loom was created allowing for mass manufacturing of fabrics with intricate designs. The fashion for shawls, available only to the wealthy, could now also be enjoyed by middle-class Victorian women, although the quality must have varied.

IMG_20180629_184353649Lacis has hung the shawls on walls each with a magnifying glass to allow for an even closer look. Some of the collection is displayed on mannequins, which gives the viewer a good idea of how they were worn and why they were so popular, particularly during the fashionable hoop-skirt era. The fullness of the skirt is a perfect means for showing off one’s expensive shawl.

As you enter the exhibit there is an Introduction Label (museum speak), offering some history and general background. Along the way there are Object Labels with descriptions and dates of each shawl and illustrations of how women sported their shawls.

I recommend this exhibit to historians, textiles enthusiasts, weavers, costumers, anyone interested in fashion! The Boteh of Kashmir and Paisley is on now through February 2, 2019. Lacis Museum of Lace and Textiles, 2982 Adeline Street, Berkeley.

On a side note – the fashion history podcast Dressed: The History of Fashion recently posted an episode all about the shawl. For a detailed explanation of the history check out Cashmere With a ‘K’: The Controversial History of a Shawl.  (Not the most professional presentation, but still very informative.)

 

Read Full Post »

It’s quite confusing in fashion right now. You have to be doing something that you really believe in. I believe women should look glamorous in this moment in their life.

Carolina Herrera – American fashion designer.

This quote is from comments made to WWD during NYC Fashion Week in fall 2017.

I agree that a little glamour back in our lives is a good thing. Ms. Herrera’s spring 2018 line is all about ladylike glamour. Here are a few of my favorites.

_MON0049

Can a shirtwaist dress look any better than this?

_MON0125

Love the buttons! Here’s where comfort meets style.

_MON0559

Let’s bring back the party dress.

_MON0483

Love this the most! Why? Because it’s a quintessential 1920s drop-waist silhouette but with a modern twist. It is, however, calling out for accessories. Perhaps matching silver cuff bracelets one on each wrist and a hat! I’d also put her in a heel.

Read Full Post »

36736085_2344918312186778_8225409658047692800_n

Here’s my outfit for The World of Frida Kahlo opening reception. I decided it would have been kind of silly for me to try to copy Kahlo’s unique style. But I wanted to give her a nod so I did my own thing keeping her in mind.

IMG_1218 (2)

The skirt reminded me of Kahlo’s billowy dresses. It belonged to my grandmother and was made in Mexico, circa 1950s. I paired that with a simple cotton peasant style blouse. The purse is from the 1920s and my signature shoes are 1940s (look at the OverDresssedforLife logo). Flowers in the hair is classic Kahlo and I went with a single white one, which suits my face better than the flower headband. (Looks great on her though.) That belt has added just the right touch to so many outfits – it’s beaded and a gift from my sis-in-law (thanks Lori!), probably vintage. To add a little color around my neck I’m sporting a shell and turquoise necklace that I remember seeing on my mother back in the 1970s. I wore silver and turquoise rings and bracelets (also my mother’s) and those cat eye shades are new.

I really enjoyed shopping my own closet and creating this ensemble. I particularly got a kick out of using so many family pieces. For sure there is more of this outfit in my future. It’s comfortable and festive … perfect for a summer evening drinking sangria out on the deck.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »