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Posts Tagged ‘fashionable quotes’

magsOn social media, fashion executives have expressed their solidarity for Black lives by posting black squares and sharing PR statements promising to do better on behalf of their companies. But how much value do these promises hold when Black interns at a prominent fashion magazine have yet to see themselves represented at all levels of the masthead?  

… Tokenism cannot be the antidote to racism and lack of representation in the workplace. In addition to hiring Black people, structural transformation must also be implemented to support and make way for upward mobility. It’s never been enough to sprinkle us on covers or on runways; there needs to be a pipeline in place that allows for Black talent to graduate to leadership roles. Because of systemic barriers in place, we are often beset with a premature disillusionment with the industry, questioning our place and purpose.

Jasmine Burgos, Abigail Cherubin, & Christopher Akintonde – Former fashion magazine interns.

This quote is from an op-ed in Business of Fashion. Click here for the full piece.

I have wondered about all the recent social media statements by corporations. How meaningful are they? Perhaps it’s a place to start but, I agree that real change has to happen beyond mere statements.

Harper’s Bazaar has appointed their first Black editor. Samira Nasr steps into the role in July. It’s an interesting time for her, for the fashion industry, for the world.

Here’s hoping we are finally inspired to do better.

 

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Orla Kiely’s iconic pattern called Stem.

Fashion is both fascinating and contradictory. It creates trends and follows them, it welcomes and rejects; it judges. I love the fact that I am a part of it but I also relish the knowledge that my design language is different. I can be an outsider. Incapable of following trends just for the sake of it, I’m not in the business of reinventing myself to be this year’s sensation. My need is to feel both inspired and satisfied by what I achieve. I do my own thing. I love fashion but I would never want to be its slave. 

Orla Kiely – Irish born fabric pattern and fashion designer.

This quote is from an article about Ms. Kiely in Selvedge magazine, a British publication covering “The Fabric of your Life: Textiles in Fashion, Fine Art, Interiors, Travel, and Shopping.” Each issue has a theme and this one is Britannia (Issue 40 May/June 2011).

I like what Ms. Kiely says here and I believe there are many ways to live fashion. She and I share a desire for independence.  I’m not into trends or brands or what I call corporate fashion. Still, I follow it all and forge my own path.

Here’s to independent spirits in fashion!

 

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samiraGreat style is about more than the way we wear our clothes. It is also how we see and occupy space in the world around us.

Samira Nasr, the next editor-in-chief of Harper’s Bazaar.

Last week Hearst Magazines announced that Samira Nasr will take the reigns from Glenda Bailey, who had been the HB editor for 19 years.

Ms. Nasr is the first Black woman to be appointed to such a position in the magazine’s 153 year history. She started her fashion career as an assistant to Grace Coddington at Vogue and she also worked for a time as fashion director for Elle. Most recently Ms. Nasr was the fashion director at Vanity Fair.

Ms. Bailey steps down at HB but she will still walk the hallways of Hearst headquarters working as “global consultant” which, as I understand it, means she will connect (make deals?) fashion marketers with Hearst magazine editors.

Congratulations to Ms. Nasr! As a subscriber to HB, I look forward to something new and exciting.

Farewell to Ms. Bailey, who kept HB alive and thriving during some really challenging times in magazine publishing.

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The Tear Dress by Elsa Schiaparelli.

 

In difficult times fashion is always outrageous. 

Elsa Schiaparelli (1890-1973), Italian born fashion designer.

Schiaparelli is my favorite designer of all time. Known for her collaboration with Surreal artist Salvador Dali, Schiaparelli designs were unique and fanciful and very much of the Art Deco era.  She turned the shape of a shoe into a hat and circus animals became buttons.

In this quote I wonder if Schiaparelli means that the idea of fashion during challenging times is outrageous. Or is she saying that fashion itself is (or should be) outrageous during such times.

Let’s go with the latter, and if it’s true then 2020 should see some extreme fashion, like the Schiaparelli dress pictured above. The Tear dress was part of the designer’s Circus Collection for summer 1938. The printed image on the delicate fabric is of cut skin reveling dark red blood underneath. There are actual slashes in the mantle worn over the head (pictured above left), which reminds me of the popularity of slashed fabrics during the 16th century.

Judith Watt says of the dress in her book Vogue on Elsa Schiaparelli (Quadrille Publishing, 2012), “The Tear dress remains a singularly hostile work … Taken out of political context in which General Franco was to seize complete power in Spain and Hitler was poised to annex Czechoslovakia and Austria, its meaning and impact is lost.”

Hostile garb for hostile times. What do we wear to reflect our current state of outrage?

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I wear my mask. What does yours look like?

People need to wear masks; they need to social distance. They need to be rigorous and responsible about this. This is not something to be taken casually or lightly … You could kill people or you could be killed yourself. 

Tim Gunn, fashion icon and host of Project Runway and Making the Cut. Gunn was recently on the radio interview show, Fresh Air with Terry Gross.

Everyone’s favorite fashion icon, Gunn shared what he’s been wearing while sheltering-in-place: sometimes pajama bottoms with a plain white t-shirt and a navy blue robe, but he says he would never step outside his NYC front door in such a casual ensemble. When he goes out to the corner store he wears a turtleneck sweater and dark wash jeans. For Zoom meetings he dons a sport coat and tie.

Gross asked if he wore a fashionable mask and he explained that he didn’t want to bother with having to consider colors or pattern. A plain medical mask goes with everything.

Good point, although, I have to admit that if I were a fashion designer I’d be working on a line of matching mask and skirt/dress/pants/jacket.

Yep, I’d be all over that! Because Covid-19 isn’t going away anytime soon and therefore, neither are masks.

 

 

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Edwardian ladies in lace. 

Society tottered through the last of the pre-War parties, waved tiny lace handkerchiefs, and carried elaborate parasols until the War came with its sweeping changes. 

Lucile, Lady Duff Gordon (1863-1935), British fashion designer.

World War I (1914-1918) brought about many changes in fashion, particularly for women. Long lacy gowns were replace by shorter skirts and jackets in sturdy fabrics. No more excessively large hats but instead close fitted hats with little to no embellishments. Women were now on the move and their clothes had to move with them.

With this Covid-19 pandemic,  we might see our own changes in fashion. Or will we? Truth be told, we really can’t get any more casual. Perhaps we will flip to the other side and want to dress up, but I doubt it. For starters, most people don’t even know how to do that anymore.

One added accessory will be masks. Perhaps more people will want to wear hats, as added protection. Also, gloves. Matching sets! I see a potential for additional pockets in clothing to make things like hand sanitizer quickly accessible. Otherwise, with the distraction of the virus and wanting to keep distant and stay safe, people, now more than ever, are going to want to be comfortable.

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James Purefoy is Beau Brummel in Beau Brummel: This Charming Man

The Dandy Style less is more. No wigs, no powder, we don’t use scent. The Dandy wears trousers. The Dandy washes. The Dandy is clean. The Dandy is neat. The Dandy does what he wants, when he wants, where he wants. 

From the 2006 movie Beau Brummel: This Charming Man.

Beau Brummel (1778-1840) was a British fashion icon who is credited with moving men’s fashion during the Regency period from Fop to Dandy.

Fops overdid themselves with wigs, heavy white powder on their faces, and embellished garb, which included breeches, hose, heavily embroidered waistcoats, frills around the neck, and coats all in bright colors. Brummel rejected all that and created a simple look: trousers, waistcoat, cravat, cutaway coat, and a top hat. Not that the Dandy didn’t put as much attention into his look as the Fop, but it was a simpler ensemble. Brummel claimed it was effortless, yet it is said that he took hours to dress.

 

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Silvia Venturini Fendi. Photo: Filippo Bamberghi. Harper’s Bazaar, April 2020.

Karl taught me that time is the best judgement of creativity. I want to make clothes that people wear throughout their lives. 

Silvia Venturini Fendi, creative director at Fendi.

Ms. Fendi has worked at her family’s brand for close to 30 years, having designed the 90s iconic Baguette bag. Last year she became creative director at Fendi after the death of Karl Lagerfeld. He had designed for Fendi for more than 50 years. Impressive!

 

 

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Patti Smith in 1977 sporting a Giorgio Armani jacket. Image: Lynn Goldsmith

Even as a kid, what I was wearing was always very important to me. I very much identified with my clothing. 

Patti Smith, American musician.

I never thought of Patti Smith as someone who would be interested in fashion. But in this article (Harper’s Bazaar, April 2020) Smith discusses just how much she liked fashion and once she got to NYC she even tried to get onto the pages of Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar.

With a taste for high fashion, but not the budget, she shopped Philadelphia thrift stores where she found treasures by Dior and Balenciaga and donned them in her own way.

I love everything about Smith’s style in this photo. In particular the scarf around her wrist, which is something I do with ribbon, and her rings. She’s wearing one big one with a black stone that might be antique and several bands in front. Stunning in its uniqueness.

Click here and check out her outfit in a live performance of Because the Night. 

 

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Excessive dress vs. toned-down attire. Left image from Fashion: The Definitive History of Costume & Style. Right image from Survey of Historic Costume.

Just now English clothing is all the wear. Rich man’s son, sprig of nobility, counter-jumper – you see them dressed all alike in the long coat, cut close, thick stockings, puffed stock; with hats on their heads and a riding-switch in their hands. Not one of the gentlemen thus attired, however, has ever crossed the Channel or can speak one word of English … No, no, my young friend. Dress French again, wear your laces, your embroidered waistcoats, your laced coats; powder your hair to the newest tune; keep your hat under your arm, in that place which nature, in Paris at any rate, designed for it, and wear your two watches, with concomitant fobs, both at once. 

Louis-Sebastien Mercier (1740-1814), French dramatist and writer. This quote is from The Waiting City: Paris, 1782-1788.

In the last 25 years of the eighteenth-century, Anglomania was all the rage in French fashion. Both men and women had grown tired of the French excessive look and turned to the simpler styles of the British. Frenchmen appreciated in particular the excellence in British tailoring and except for appearances at court, they adopted a more casual mode of dress.

 

 

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