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Posts Tagged ‘fashionable quotes’

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Dress & skirt inspired by traditional Korean embroidered wedding robe with peony, phoenix, and butterfly motifs and combined with denim. Jin Teok, 1995. This piece was part of the Couture Korea exhibit.

My mother’s generation greatly valued tradition in fashion. Until the day she died, she kept her hair in a bun, as women did in the Joseon Period (1392-1910). She made her own clothes with different materials for each of the four seasons. She wore durumagi, a traditional Korean overcoat, made of silk fabrics called myeongju and jamisa in jade green. In winter she wore cotton-padded durumagi, a scarf made of silk, and rubber shoes, which I used to wipe clean whenever she was about to go out. I grew up in such a traditional family. 

Jin Teok, renowned South Korean fashion designer.

This quote is from the essay, Creating Contrasts in Korean Fashion by Jin Teok from the catalogue for Couture Korea, the exhibit at the San Francisco Asian Art Museum in 2017.

One of the things I noticed when I visited Seoul, South Korea was the contrast of traditional and modern – in the architecture, the food, the old and the young people – existing side by side. Seoul is very much a mixture and in that way it’s fascinating.

Jin Teok started her fashion career in 1965 and has been called a “pioneer of Korean fashion.” Known for blending the silhouettes and motifs of traditional Korean clothing with modern fashion, Teok designed the uniforms for the Korean 1988 Olympic teams and a few years later she designed the Asiana Airlines flight attendant uniforms. She has participated in many international fashion shows, putting Korean fashion in a global spotlight.

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IMG_20190922_160622Don’t be afraid to be appropriate. It has become a dirty word in fashion and style talk. But for me, being appropriate means simply being in touch with the moment. When you are in touch with the moment, with yourself, you communicate effortlessly. 

Isabel Toledo (1961-2019), Cuban-American fashion designer.

 

This is a quote from Toledo’s 2012 memoir, Roots of Style: Weaving Together Life, Love, and Fashion (Celebra Books).

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One of the many illustrations by Ruben Toledo in Roots of Style. 

I recently reread this book, which tells the fascinating story of the Toledos – both of whom immigrated to the US from Cuba as children. They met in high school and later forged ahead in their careers as a couple in 1980s Manhattan. Ruben Toledo is an artist and fashion illustrator. His charming illustrations are a highlight of the book.

As for the quote, well, I of course completely agree. Dressing appropriately shows presence in the moment whether that be a wedding, a funeral, a graduation, an expensive restaurant, the theater, the opera … it matters.

 

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IMG_20190828_123730It used to be about logo, logo, logo, big name, big name, big name. Now people can easily wear a t-shirt from Zara holding a Louis Vuitton bag. 

Xia Ding, President of the Chinese online retailer, JD.com.

Oh gosh, the whole logo thing. In doing some research on Louis Vuitton and Chanel handbags, I discovered that there are serious collectors out there. Women who buy logo bag after logo bag, wallets, pouches, and apparently LV and Chanel maintain their value while some of the others do not. I watched a few videos of women discussing what to look for in the secondhand market. To see how much these women own was kind of off-putting.  OK, one or two but dozens? We’re talking a lot of money and these women don’t look like Rockefellers.

Personally I like an understated quality handbag that doesn’t scream brand or designer. I’m always switching out my handbags, which vary in size and style. I have a small vintage collection that I use on certain occasions. I do own one well known brand, Coach. I like the older styles that echo Bonnie Cashin’s designs. There are four in my closet, all from the 1990s and none have the Coach logo. One was a gift from my bother. One was a find at TJ Maxx at half the retail price, and another my mother picked up at a thrift store. Then there is the really special Coach bag that I saved up for and bought myself. I appreciate and use each one and I have no desire for another.

To each her own … that’s what makes fashion and style so fascinating.

 

 

 

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A costume for Princess Margaret played by Vanessa Kirby in The Crown.  Hand-embroidered and beaded floral appliques with the unexpected pockets. 

The exhibition examines costumes from public and private moments depicted in the show … People are clearly captivated by the coronation robes and regalia, and they have enjoyed the wedding dresses – replicas of both Princess Elizabeth’s and Princess Margaret’s. But our visitor’s survey indicates that Princess Margaret’s hand-painted and beaded gown with the pockets is a strong favorite. 

Kim Collison – exhibitions manager at Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library in Delaware.

Ms. Collison is speaking to Victoria magazine of Costuming The Crown, the current exhibit on at Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library. On view are 40 costumes from the popular Netflix series, which fictionalizes the life of Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest reigning monarch.

 

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IMG_20190828_120037I get a lot of fashion press on the shows I design, and journalists always ask what the brands are, so I always point out that it is not about the brands, it is about the pieces I combine to make an outfit and a character. We need to take control of the narrative. This is one of the reasons I feel we need to embrace social media, so we are part of the story, not a side note. 

Salvador Perez, award winning costume designer and president of the Costume Designers Guild, Local 892-I.A.T.S.E.

Mr. Perez has costumed many a television series including The Mindy Project, Veronica Mars, and Moonlight.

I agree that costume designers should be acknowledged for their work. But I see that it’s confusing to laypeople when costuming isn’t always about building costumes. Often these days, particularly with contemporary costuming, costumers are actually assembling outfits off the rack. When they use recognizable brands, that’s what’s going to get the attention, not necessarily how the outfits were put together or who did it. People don’t really understand what goes into costuming and that the choices designers make, from color to silhouette to accessories, all reflect the character. It’s detailed. It’s complicated.

 

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The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

 

Speaking of costumes, the Emmy Awards are coming up on September 14th. In the period costume category nominees include Donna Zakowska for We’re Going to the Catskills episode of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel on Prime Video and Melissa Toth for Life is a Cabaret in the Fosse/Verdon series on FX Networks.

 

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Fosse/Verdon

 

Any favorites?

 

 

 

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I wore miniskirts when I was younger. We used to hide them in our bags before going out. And we wore bloomers underneath because we danced rock ‘n’ roll. Then we went from very short to very long, and one day when I was wearing one of those long skirts, my grandmother said to me: “Good lord, you look like a musty old granny!” That was the end of that. 

France’s First Lady, Brigitte Macron. Quote from Elle magazine, originally published in French Elle and translated from French.

That was the end of that all right. Almost every photo I found of Ms. Macron she was in a short dress. In the other photos she sported straight-leg jeans.

The hemline might be a bit short but otherwise, I think the look suits her and is appropriate for her position as First Lady.

At age 66 she is anything but a musty old granny!

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My grandmother and my mother, c.1933.

I remembered her pretty black coat of shinning silk brocade. The smooth black hair meticulously combed and dressed with sweet oil. The little white flower she wore at the nape of her neck. And there was that dainty high-collared blouse of cream-colored silk … with the black satin pants of three quarter length that stopped inches short of her trim little feet. 

Gene Sayre, pseudonym of Louise Brown Marshall, my grandmother.

This description is of Yatside, a youthful Chinese woman in 1930s China. It’s taken from a short story called You Goody For Me, which was written in 1939 and somewhat based on my grandmother’s experience living in China as a Navy captain’s wife.

Yes, my grandmother was a writer too. She penned several stories of her travel adventures and this one fictionalizes the day she met Yatside. Mrs. Albright (my grandmother) is holding an infant in her arms and just about to board a boat headed up the north coast and away from “war-stirred” Shanghai. Out of nowhere Yatside grabs her arm, points to the baby and says, “can do.” She is offering to work as a nanny and as it happens, that’s just what our protagonist needs. There begins a story of culture clashes, bonding, and finally, respect.

I can easily picture stylish Yatside – pretty and demure – and I’m willing to bet that the way she was dressed, as well as her manner, helped my grandmother make that split-second decision to take her on as a nanny.

IMG_20190816_172450668 (1)I feel very fortunate to have my grandmother’s stories, many are the original typed manuscripts. I’m learning a lot about not just her life, but also her conflicts, world view, how she treated people, and I’m getting a glimpse at some of her inner thoughts.

What a gift!

 

 

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