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Posts Tagged ‘fashionable quotes’

amelia-earhartWhen I’m flying in my little plane, I usually wear a sports costume with a rather full skirt and a close-fitting hat. Sometimes I slip a leather windbreaker on under my coat, for the temperature drops as one ascends.  … Usually on a solo flight, I wear low-heeled shoes, because with low heels it is easier to keep my feet braced on the rubber bar … On the Friendship flight … the trip was pioneering one, and comforts were not thought of. For instance, there was no step from the pontoons to the door, and I couldn’t have jumped into the plane in a skirt. Further … we had dumped everything to sit on, to save weight. Squatting on a rolled flying suit, or kneeling on one knee, or sliding between the large gas tanks wouldn’t have left much of ladylike ensemble.

Amelia Earhart (1897-disappeared 1937), pilot and first women to fly solo across the Atlantic. This quote is from an essay Ms. Earhart wrote for Harper’s Bazaar in 1929.

Ha! And we think we have it hard flying these days.

Ms. Earhart created her own style for flying, which often included trousers, button down shirt topped with a leather jacket and a scarf. Looking at photos it seemed she felt more comfortable in sporty attire than the more traditional feminine frocks of her era.

Speaking of flying and attire, as I get ready for traveling this week I’m pondering what to wear in flight. It is tough in these days of overcrowded airplanes balancing comfort with looking presentable. Anything tailored is too restricting, skirts are impractical for sitting, and who wants to risk our really nice pieces of clothing to the grit and grim of airline seats?

I usually go simple in corduroy pants and a long-sleeved cotton t-shirt. I add a scarf and my trusty beret for a little chic factor – accessories can upgrade any outfit. Outerwear might be my tweed coat or this time of year I think I’ll go with a puffer vest. Oxfords rather than sneakers also keep the look sharp. (Although, sneakers are looking pretty darn fashionable lately.)

How about you, my fashionable readers? How you do manage to look nice and stay comfortable while flying? Vintage-loving readers, how do you keep vintage while traveling?

Please share your thoughts by leaving a comment.

 

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IMG_20170406_181138357Linda Gravenites turns them out slowly and turns them out well and only turns them out for those she likes.

Janis Joplin (1943-1970)

Janis is speaking to Vogue magazine in 1968 about her friend Linda Gravenites, who at one time was her roommate and her stage costume designer.

The pictured beaded bag was made for Janis by her friend, Linda – glass beads and silk embroidered on goat skin. Wow!

This bag is on display at The Summer of Love Experience: Art, Fashion, and Rock & Roll, an exhibition at the de Young Museum celebrating the 50th anniversary of the magical summer in 1967, that could happen only in San Francisco.

I was attracted to Janis’ bag because of course it’s beautiful but also it’s an excellent example of the hippie fashion aesthetic. Young people of the 1960s mixed it all up: handcrafting, re-purposing combined with influences such as the Wild West and vintage. Victorian and Edwardian clothing in particular were favorites as both men and women picked up for a song blouses, skirts, suits, and hats at local thrift stores and flea markets.

This hand-beaded bag is reminiscent of the Edwardian period when women sported a demure reticule, handy for only a handkerchief. Janis’ bag is larger and must have taken quite some time (and eye strain) to make. No wonder Linda had to really like someone to turn out one of these.

Stay tuned – there’s more to come about The Summer of Love Experience: Art, Fashion, and Rock & Roll on OverDressedforLife.

 

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http _s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com_fthtsi-assets-production_ez_images_0_1_2_1_511210-1-eng-GB_main_5a8779b9-4b91-42d7-87bb-75a38d64cb40I see a great return of activism in the fashion industry. I think fashion has the power to communicate important things in a moment where everybody is worried. Fashion has a unifying power. But this has to be done with a light hand, without arrogance.

Silvia Venturini Fendi, Italian designer for the men’s collection, Fendi.

I was just reading about the German occupation of France during WWII and how young French citizens used fashion to communicate their resistance.

They called themselves Zazous (after a song by American jazz musician Cab Calloway) and were considered a subculture of mostly young people, 17-20 years old.

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Cab Calloway in a Zoot Suit.

The Zazou man sported long suit jackets with extra wide pants often in check patterns. This was an affront to the strict fabric restrictions and inspired by the American Zoot Suit, a style at the time popular among Blacks and Latinos who had their own resistance to communicate. Zazous favored thick soled shoes, jazz music, and swing dancing. Women wore very short flared skirts with tight sweaters, and tailored jackets. Accessories included large dark sunglasses, red lipstick, and striped tights. Both the guys and gals grew their hair long in defiance of the 1942 French government decree for barbershops to donate cut hair to the war effort – to make sweaters and slippers.

The possible current trend for Resistance Style (am I coining a new phrase?) so far has been limited to the statement t-shirt and the occasional safety pin. But I suspect that in the near future we will see more communication from individuals and designers.

This could be very interesting.

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2014-06-26-tomfordFashion is so perishable and if you have a thought even the night before that what you’re doing is wrong and it already feels old and looks old, you have to move heaven and earth. You have to kill yourself. You have to drive everyone around you crazy to get it to exactly where it should be and as close as it can be to the right thing before it goes out on the runway. 

– Tom Ford, American fashion designer. Speaking in the 2004 documentary, Seamless.

NYC Fashion Week is in full swing through February 16th.

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thatgirl6

When I launched my television series That Girl in 1966, I never expected to set fashion trends. I was just excited to be bringing something groundbreaking to viewers: TV’s first independent working woman. Still, my character’s colorful, mod outfits resonated with That Girls everywhere. Her wardrobe announced that a new kind of woman- and a new age – had arrived.

– Marlo Thomas, star and executive producer of the television series That Girl, 1966-1971.

Ms. Thomas goes on to say in a recent interview that she has discovered, since maturing from a girl to a woman (she’s 79), that there are few sartorial choices for women such as herself that “express who we are.” What she finds are bare midriffs, slits up too high, etc. She wants a look that is covered but not covered up.

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Marlo Thomas models clothing from her new line That Woman.

Inspired, Ms. Thomas set about creating clothing that announces another new kind of woman:one of age and style.

Her clothing line is called That Woman and it debuted this month on HSN. The line offers fashions for women over 40 that both compliment and empower. Included in the 15 piece collection are dresses, tops, skirts, pants, and dusters.

Hey, have you ever watched That Girl? It’s a vintage sartorial treat! Check it out on Youtube.

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NPG x135803; Quentin Crisp by Angus McBeanOnce you have decided you are a stylist, you must keep your eye on the ultimate horizon – your finale. A way of ending it on your own terms. Otherwise you’ll find yourself on an iron bedstead in a rented room with people around you saying, ‘He can’t last much longer.’

– Quentin Crisp (1908-1999), English author.

 

This quote made me think of the recent passing of Carrie Fisher and one day later her mother Debbie Reynolds, who said that she wanted to be with her daughter. Certainly, two women who left us in style.

 

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RIP

 

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ann-demeulemeester-02-760x760Black is not sad. Bright colors are what depress me. They’re so empty. Black is poetic. How do you imagine a poet? In a bright yellow jacket? Probably not.

– Ann Demeulemeester, Belgium fashion designer.

Ms. Demeulemeester loves black and she’s also known for her Goth inspired designs. She goes for deconstruction with a touch of Victorian/Edwardian details. She, along with Jil Sander, came along in the 1990s and put European countries other than France into fashion focus.

 

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Ann Demeulemeester Spring 2013

As for her comment on black. Well, black is a wonderful option but I think color has its place. We can’t all sport black all the time; that might be slightly somber. But I do understand what Ms. Demeulemeester is saying in terms of depth. Black is rich and full and sometimes poignant. Color is fanciful and uplifting.  The world needs both.

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