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Posts Tagged ‘fashionable quotes’

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… today most consumers fail to understand the human cost of manufacturing garments at such low prices. Living in a discount culture, TV shows continue to perpetuate this misnomer through their steal and deal segments. A majority of people see the rise of fast fashion giants, such a Zara and H&M, as a revolution in democratizing runway trends, but does the consumer stop to think or even care that their new Celine-like ensemble comes at the cost of a human life?

Ariele Chantel Elia – MSL candidate in Fashion Law at Fordham University, Industry/Project Coordinator for MFA Fashion Design program at Fashion Institute of Technology.

This quote of from Scholars’ Roundtable Presentation, 2018 Costume Society of America Symposium. Printed in Dress: The Journal of the Costume Society of America, v.44, #2, 2018. The title of the discussion was Engaging Labor, Acknowledging Maker.

Some consumers do care and are thinking about the cost of fast-fashion. This brings to mind Fashion Revolution Week, the annual event that seeks to highlight the people around the world who make our clothes. Who are they? What are their lives like?

Behind Fashion Revolution Week is the UK based non-profit organization Fashion Revolution. Their intent with the week is to remind consumers of the Rana Plaza factory collapse, in which 1138 workers died and many were injured. Also during this time people around the world are planning various events to highlight the true cost of fashion and inspire us to think and question.

One of the many campaigns for the week is #whomademyclothes? Sport a piece of clothing inside out so the label shows. Take a selfie holding a sign that says – Who Made My Clothes? Post on Instagram and Twitter with #whomademyclothes? Make sure to share with the brand you’re wearing.

This year Fashion Revolution Week is April 22nd – 28th. It’s a time to consider and ask questions about what we wear. Join in!

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qKBCeTOLKJwCWe wear what everyone else wears, but that in turn is constantly undermined by changes which take place in society. In the 1950s, that “everyone” was in twinsets and pearls; a decade later, it was miniskirts. The radicalized 1960s was a decade whose true and enduring revolution was the sexual one. Clothes were part of the physical liberation of the body, the undoing of what Dior had made twenty years earlier. Chic, elegance, style, femininity were no longer the measure of how you dressed. You dressed to feel free inside, and feeling free, perhaps you could actually make yourself (and others) free. You cannot take part in a demonstration in stilettos. 

Linda Grant, British author.

This quote is taken from the non-fiction book, The Thoughtful Dresser: The Art of Adornment, the Pleasures of Shopping, and Why Clothes Matter (Scribner, 2009).

Reading The Thoughtful Dresser I have wondered what Ms Grant would have to say about athleisure and the trend for sloppy dressing. I’m about two thirds into the book and she hasn’t commented yet.

What she does discuss is shifts in fashion from the 1940s on as well as the importance of clothing in society and to her personally. She says, “how we choose to dress defines who we are … how we look and what we wear tells a story.”

With her own stories and stories of others (including Catherine Hill, a refugee in Canada after WWII who went on to become a successful buyer for women’s clothing in various department stores) Ms Grant takes on the topic of fashion in a serious but accessible manner.

I’m enjoying The Thoughtful Dresser and I recommend it to fashion enthusiasts, particularly those interested in fashion history.

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downloadI was in Silicon Valley and with a lot of senior, grown-up people, not the Millennials. I was out there for a couple of days and it just struck me that they didn’t see it, but they all dressed exactly alike – they all wear jeans, they all wear navy blazers, they all wear shirts without ties. If you’re a multi-million-dollar-a-year Silicon Valley executive, you dress like a civilian because you’re wearing jeans, but you’re wearing $2,000 brown Italian shoes … that’s how you express your individuality. 

Leslie H. Wexner, CEO L Brands.

This quote is from an interview Mr. Wexner did with WWD, June 2016.

Jeans? How depressing. At least the older guys are wearing blazers – I bet the younger ones are not. Still, it’s a look that, for me, does not inspire any confidence and I certainly don’t find it attractive. I like an executive to look like an executive, not a “civilian.” I know that suits these days are dated, but there must be some way to balance a professional look with modern lifestyles. But really, at the office no sneakers! No jeans! Please guys, dress like a grown-up, not like your ten-year-old son.

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Interview-Julie-de-Libran-la-styliste-qui-a-redynamise-la-maison-RykielWhat’ he’s doing at Marni feels more than what the big brands are doing. We have too many clothes, and it’s wonderful to see a young designer giving value to things, making them less throwaway, adding a story to the workmanship. 

 

Julie de Libran, creative director at Sonia Rykiel.,

Ms. de Libran is speaking about Marni creative director, Francesco Risso (W magazine, v. 2 2019).

This comment reminds me a of recent conversation I had with my mother. We were taking about boots. I said I had three pair, each very different  for different looks/purposes. They were expensive but simple. I take care of them and continue to wear them season after season. She said that she also preferred quality over quantity. “I’d rather have fewer things but always good quality.”

Quality, value, story. Nothing cheap. No more throwaway. Is there a shift in our fashionable future?

 

 

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Nicole Kidman in The Destroyer.

We took so long to find the leather jacket that I wear in pretty much every frame of the film. I became so obsessed with that jacket, I would wear it at home. I put it on first thing in the morning. My kids visited the set and were shocked at the way I looked.  

Nicole Kidman, Australian born actress.

In an interview for W magazine (v.1 2019) Kidman was talking about the jacket she wore in her most recent film, The Destroyer, which was released in December 2018. Costumes by Audrey Fisher.

I see how an article of clothing can help actors find their characters: Hercule Poirot’s spats; Holly Golightly’s little black dress; Columbo’s top coat.

Clothing or accessories are part of what defines us. For example my mother is known for her scarves. People think of me in hats, particularly cloche. I once worked with a woman who, every day, wore an armful of silver bracelets, many of them handcrafted with turquoise by Native Americans. We might have been a bit bewildered had she ever shown up at work without those bracelets. 

I call these signature piecesSome people have a signature piece and don’t even know it. They’re just wearing what they like.  It could be a ring one wears every day, like a class ring. It could be a  go-to jacket or a silk flower on a lapel. Perhaps a certain brand of distinctive shoe such as Dr. Marten’s. 

How about you? Do you have a signature piece?

 

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Francesco Risso. Speaking of inspiration, the window in the background reminds me of bojagi.

I’m a passionate collector of images. I like to imagine characters in a story, but you need a reference – a flower, a piece of art, anything that can connect you with that story. Today I found this incredible Chinese  man holding lanterns. I hope one day, opening my drawers, to bring out a story that will be an inspiration for something. 

Francesco Risso, creative director of Marni since 2016.

This quote is taken from an interview that Risso did with Joshua Levine for W magazine, v.2 2019.

The Chinese man that he refers to is an English brooch from the 1940s. The man is made of gold and the hem and cuffs of his robe are encrusted with diamonds. I can picture that charming brooch and I hope one day to spot the inspiration it brings to the Marni line.

It is said that Risso has “put his own stamp on Marni,” which was initially an upset after 20 years of designer/ owner Consuelo Castiglioni in charge. (Castiglioni sold Marni to  OTB Group in 2012.) Risso admits that he didn’t follow the codes of the house. But he has since settled in and earned widespread respect for his sense of individuality and diversity in his references.

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The whimsical designs of Francesco Risso for Marni. How ironic that an outside the box kind of designer works for a large fashion conglomerate. But it’s the outsider types that the corporations are hiring  these days. Quirky sells.

 

 

 

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IMG_20190224_111647It sacrifices the integrity of my outfit if I have socks on between my shoes and pants.

Hannah Shanefield, Boston MA. – quoted from the Wall Street Journal article, Why Are There Bare Ankles Everywhere?, February 13, 2019.

Apparently, the fashion today is no socks, no tights, no nothin’ on your feet no matter how cold it is. I don’t even know what to say to this except … embrace the sock!

 

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