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Posts Tagged ‘fashionable quotes’

Bette-Nash4In the old days, we saw a lot of mink coats. Today, we see a lot of flip-flops.

Bette Nash, American Airlines flight attendant.

Ms. Nash, 81, just celebrated her 60th anniversary working as a flight attendant.

I chose this quote (from an article by Lori Aratani for The Washington Post) because it’s sadly funny and pretty much says it all about how far we’ve descended into sartorial sloppiness.

I know flying is hard. It’s crowded, long, and unpleasant. But what if at least some of us made the effort to look nice? Maybe not a fur coat but a blazer? A pair of slacks instead of yoga pants or jeans. Add a scarf and a cap. Perhaps our experience would be more positive and we just might inspire other travelers to up their game.

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These things you ought to bear in mind always: buy good things only and never be afraid of wearing them too often or of not ‘being in style.’ If you have good clothes, in good taste, you will always be chic and you can ignore passing fads. 

Elsa Schiaparelli (1890-1973). Italian fashion designer.

In these modern days of throwaway fashion, this is good advice.

I used to have a problem with wearing something too often. But since I started making my own clothing as well as having them made, I want to wear my things over and over. That’s kind of the point, right? Plus this is the way to create a signature look. (I have several unique summer and winter hats that I’ve been wearing for years. Now people recognize these hats as my signature.)

The trick is to stay with simple silhouettes that never really go out of fashion – a-line skirts that hover around the knee; sheath dresses; straight-leg pants; Oxford shirts or button down blouses. A basic t-shirt is always in style (but not the ubiquitous cold shoulder). Accessories will add any needed interest.

One might ask – how about getting bored with the same old thing? Well, I don’t find that to be the case because I dress by season. Yep, even up against Climate Change and warming temps I stick with certain styles and colors for each season. After a winter of greens and browns in tweed skirts and cardigan sweaters by spring it feels fresh to revisit my violet shirtwaist dress or my cotton black and white skirt.  It’s almost like a new wardrobe only better because it’s familiar.

 

 

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Divan Japonais by Toulouse-Lautrec, 1893. 

You must understand that the accessories are an integral part of the picture. 

Henri De Toulouse-Lautrec (1864-1901), French artist.

Yes! Hats! Gloves! Scarves! Jewelry! Accessories complete the picture, complete the look. A jaunty hat? That’s panache. A pair of gloves in red or … purple? How daring. An antique ring on every finger? What pizzazz!

We love it all and all of it makes for excellent holiday gifts. Particularly vintage and handmade.

Let the holidays begin with style.

 

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woa-gabriela-perezetti-main-smallMy whole family used to use this seamstress, Tota, … growing up in Uruguay there were no fancy stores around – the nicest thing you could do was get European fabrics and have things made … We wouldn’t buy a lot but for each important stage of life or big event we’d have something made. There’s a suit from my mother, this olive wool skirtsuit with a blazer that has, like, a military seal and her initials embroidered on the pocket … I always loved the whole outfit, so much so that when we launched the first collection, I had that suit in it. It’s always been a reference to quality materials made to last …

Gabriela Hearst, women’s fashion designer. Quote from Elle magazine, October 2017.

I am a big fan of custom made clothing. I have an expanding wardrobe of fashions made just for me from dresses, to blouses, to a beautiful 1920s inspired coat.

It’s pure pleasure to don perfectly fitted clothing for which you have chosen the design and fabrics. Each piece is unique, well made, and it feels extra good to have supported local seamstresses/designers.

Also, I can relate to Ms. Hearst’s fondness for her mother’s wardrobe. What is it about our mother’s clothing from our childhoods? I too have memories of what my mother wore – specific images that I like to revisit. I even have some of the vintage pieces right out of her closet. Many of them special occasion outfits, but it’s the everyday pieces that I’m drawn to. The ones I saw all the time – the tweed skirts and Oxford shirts; slacks and desert boots. The outfits that identified a mom as my Mom.

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Danielle-Steel-QuotesStyle simply IS. You can’t buy it. You can’t pay people to give it to you, and you cannot fake it. You have it or you don’t. Truly stylish, drop dead chic women have style at 15 or 97. It really is ageless … The trend today of being dressed “by someone” makes most women appear to be wearing someone else’s looks, or as if they’ve borrowed their clothes … Women need to be braver about wearing their own style and looks, even if they make some mistakes. The mistakes can be cool too!

Danielle Steel, romance novelist and San Francisco socialite. This quote was taken from an essay Ms. Steel wrote for Harper’s Bazaar (November 2017).

I spotted Ms. Steel one time when I was on assignment covering the reopening of the Chanel store on Maiden Lane in San Francisco. She was sporting a fur coat and seemingly having fun trying on shoes.

As for having style, well, sure some women (and men) just have a sense for what is stylish but I don’t know that one who perhaps doesn’t have a natural affinity can’t figure it out. If someone really wants to pay attention and work on it, they too can have style. Why not? And that’s where “being dressed by someone” can help. A stylist acts as a guide and gets their client on the right track. It’s true you can’t buy style and no one can give it to you. It has to come from within, so to speak. But it is something that can develop. I think it’s the process of developing and growing that makes fashion fun.

Speaking of style of a different sort, Ms. Steel evidently still types her manuscripts on a typewriter. HB published her original typed version complete with cross outs and handwritten edits. Now that’s true (not fake) STYLE.

 

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christy-turlington-business-of-being-born_oywna4The best way to protect young models is to keep them in school and off sets until they are adults. But that’s only part of the problem. We need to teach our girls, and young boys, how to protect themselves and defend themselves against predators in every area of their lives. Sexual harassment can happen anywhere and at any time. In the playground, in school, on the bus, in crowded public spaces. Accepting this and preparing for it will help more of us know how to handle it when it does happen.

Christy Turlington Burns – 1980s super model, founder of the non-profit Every Mother Counts. 

This quote is from a Q&A with WWD.

Well stated. There’s a lot of talk these days about sexual harassment in fashion and elsewhere. I suspect that unfortunately, there are very few women who have not been sexually harassed. The severity varies but the impact is similar. Of course we mustn’t put up with it and we should fight it in every way we can, but I seriously doubt that we will ever be able to erase sexual harassment entirely. There will always be jerks in the world. So, Ms. Burns’ advice is good. Let’s teach our girls and boys how to safeguard themselves. While we also teach our children to see and respect one another as equals.

Everything begins with awareness and education.

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Edith HeadIn the days of the motion picture industry and even as late as the 1950s, stars had trademarks: Jean Harlow with her white satin dresses; Dietrich with her tailored slacks; Garbo with her slouch hats and trench coats; and Marilyn Monroe with her slightly tousled hair and tight clothes. But as we moved into the 1960s, the female stars didn’t really care what what they wore on the set or off. If two stars showed up at a party wearing the same dress, neither of them cared. Nobody cared. It was as if individualism had been thrown out the window in the name of realism. 

Edith Head (1887-1981), Hollywood costume designer.

Ms. Head certainly had a signature look or trade mark – she always sported a suit, she wore her hair up in a tight bun, and she loved those very round glasses.

My signature look is hats! I sport a hat of some kind every day. My mother likes to wear a silk scarf. What’s your signature look?

Happy Birthday to Ms. Head who would have celebrated on October 28th.

 

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