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Posts Tagged ‘fashionable quotes’

Students at Mills Seminary and that’s Mills Hall in the background. C. 1870s.

No uniform is required, but it is especially desired that the outfit be plain, and so complete as to avoid necessity for frequent purchase during term time. All are expected to look carefully and properly after their own wardrobes, and to keep an accurate account of their expenditures. Every article of clothing should be distinctly marked with the whole name. All should come provided with thick boots, and with flannels for use in Winter.

Mills Seminary, Circa 1872.

I was doing some research in the Mills College archives for an article and I came across this little fashion tidbit.

I am reminded of the private school I went to in 7th and 8th grades, Bentley. We didn’t have a uniform but we did have a strict dress code. No jeans, no shorts, no t-shirts, and no pants on girls. We didn’t have to dress in “plain” clothing and I didn’t. I loved patterns and color and I really enjoyed putting my outfits together, of course! It was then that I started wearing pantyhose (they didn’t seem as uncomfortable as they are now) and I bought my first pair of heels – a mere two inches and they were chunky. (I graduated to stilettos in high school.)

Back to the quote – one might wonder, why thick boots? Well, doing my research I learned that Susan and Cyrus Mills, the couple that ran the seminary at the time, were very keen on physical exercise. The young women were encouraged to take advantage of the vast open landscape of the campus and go on daily walks. Boots were a necessity. Flannels were soft wool undergarments worn for warmth.

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On the set of And Just Like That this past summer. I don’t know about the boho look for Miranda.

I’m inspired as a costume designer by what I see young people doing. Either on the internet or standing right in front of me – street fashion.

Molly Rogers – American costume designer.

Ms. Rogers is currently working on the costumes for And Just Like That – the Sex and the City reboot due to air on HBO Max in December of this year.

Her past gigs include the television show Ugly Betty and the hit movie The Devil Wears Prada and she also worked closely with Patricia Field on the SATC series as well as both movies. Rogers had been working with Field since 1984 when she popped into the stylists’ shop and asked for a job.

Now she’s going solo with And Just Like That, as Field is busy working on Emily in Paris.

There are several Instagram accounts following the series production around NYC and providing us with a sneak peek at the costumes, which are getting mixed reviews.

As for the quote – there’s nothing better than street fashion IF you happen to live in a place like NYC or London or Pairs. People watching in such places offers amazing inspiration. But elsewhere there is little to no inspiring fashion to be found. So we have magazines, Instagram, and television shows like – And Just Like That.

I’m looking forward to indulging on some serious fashion candy come December.

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Whitney Peak donning all Chanel for Elle magazine.

My style dictates how I want to feel throughout the day. So if I want to feel cool, and it’s swag, I’ll do the big pants, maybe a shirt, definitely a cool sneaker, jewelry galore. Probably big hair. And if I feel a little more elevated, I’ll do a leather boot, and a pair of trousers, maybe a black trenchcoat.

Whitney Peak, American actress.

Ms. Peak is starring in the HBO Max Gossip Girl Reboot.

I don’t know much about the original (2007-2012) or the reboot Gossip Girl except that the show focusses on a group of wealthy NYC kids who dress head to toe designer (better than ANY real high school kid) and they are remarkably nasty to one another – I wonder how real that part is? I watched some excerpts of the original and some of the reboot on YouTube and I’d say the costumes and the characters are even edgier in the reboot.

Entertaining? Perhaps. Healthy role modeling for youth? Perhaps not.

That’s my two cents for what it’s worth. xoxo

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PARIS, FRANCE – CIRCA 1988: Patrick Kelly at the Patrick Kelly Spring 1989 show circa 1988 in Paris, France. (Photo by PL Gould/IMAGES/Getty Images)

I just want my clothes to make you smile.

Patrick Kelly (1954-1990), American fashion designer.

Well, I think Mr. Kelly achieved that desire. His whimsical fashions definitely make me smile.

Tune in tomorrow for my two cents on Patrick Kelly: Runway of Love exhibition on now at the de Young Museum.

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Winter coats, an important investment and carefully treasured, now unbelted and set aside. Sweaters and cardigans, often home-made, with patches of wool fluff where the arms rubbed against the body, peeled off. Then, more hesitantly, the front buttons of blouses, and neat side zips of dresses and skirts, all creased from the journey, possibly marked with sweat. Shoes and boots – off, placed together out of habit, their insoles gently curved to fit the owner’s feet, the heels scuffed from all the steps their owners had walked. Socks rolled off, perhaps new, perhaps darned. Stockings unclipped from girdles and garter belts. Legs bare. Feet cold on concrete.

Lucy Adlington – British fashion historian and author of The Dressmakers of Auschwitz (Harper).

In this passage, Ms. Adlington is describing how the new arrivals at Auschwitz concentration camp had to completely disrobe.

Please check back with ODFL tomorrow for my book review of The Dressmakers of Auschwitz: The True Story of the Women Who Sewed to Survive.

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Balenciaga gown, 1961. Part of the In Pursuit of Fashion: The Sandy Schreier Collection exhibition at the Met 2019/2020.

Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar were my picture books; they were my Mother Goose.

Sandy Schreier – American fashion collector and fashion historian author.

This quote is from an interview that Ms. Schreier did with the popular podcast, Dressed: The History of Fashion hosted by April Calahan and Cassidy Zachery.

Come back tomorrow and read more about Sandy Schreier.

Who else out there looked at fashion magazines as a child? My mother told me that she used to cut out images and make paper dolls. Certainly, there’s a fairytale quality to fashion magazines – the beautiful models, the extraordinary clothing, the exotic photoshoots – it’s pure fantasy. And who can resist?

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Yayoi Kusama and Joseph Cornell, circa 1970.

I was cute and lovely and always dressed nicely so I stood out. So people would stop and look at us like, ‘who’s that couple?’

Yayoi Kusama, Japanese artist.

I recently watched the documentary, Kusama Infinity. While living in New York in the 1960s Ms. Kusama dated American artist Joseph Cornell, who was many years older than she.

Ms. Kusama experienced a lot of challenges and hardship as an artist during a time when women in the NY art scene where not taken seriously. Still, she persisted and received some acclaim for work such as her soft sculptures and installations. Having endured much trauma in her childhood, she suffered from hallucinations; to help manage these frightening episodes she drew them, which is where her consistent use of nets and dots come from.

Since the 1990s Ms. Kusama has become an internationally recognized pop artist and today attracts millions of people to her exhibits. She also has crossed over into fashion, selling her own designs in department stores and collaborating with brand designers such as Louis Vuitton.

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Annabelle Wallis. Photo: Tom Munro

When I’m in a business meeting, there’s a strength that has to come in with me. I’m wearing a tailored jacket; I’m wearing jewelry … My mum has always said that the way you dress is also out of respect for the person who’s receiving you. So, if someone invites me to something or I go to an event, I make sure I’m arriving in respect of their gesture.

Annabelle Wallis, British actress and Cartier ambassador.

This quote is from an insert in Elle magazine, August 2021. A collaboration between Elle and Cartier, the insert is all about the iconic jewelry pieces, such as the Trinity ring and Panthere watch, designed by Cartier.

I always think about how I’m dressed when I attend a conference, attend a press preview, or when I interview someone in person. These are professional situations and I want to dress appropriately. I find that anything tailored makes me feel polished and presentable. Often I’ll wear one of my vintage tailored jackets with an added brooch on the lapel; the vintage aspect takes it out of the ordinary and the brooch gives the look a personal touch.

Ms. Wallis’ comment about dress and respect reminds me of a wedding that I went to years ago. It was a traditional wedding – the bride in a white wedding gown, the groom in a black tuxedo. The guests were dressed in their celebratory finest, except one guy. This guy, who showed up late, was not wearing his finest (I assume), but instead a short sleeve t-shirt, a pair of shorts, and … hiking boots! Talk about blatant lack of respect.

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The problem is there’s no Carrie in Carrie’s Looks. There’s lots of well-meaning, inoffensive ensembles, form-flattering moments, vaguely interesting shapes. There are pieces from Carrie’s original wardrobe—the baguette, the belt, the second proposal Manolos—but there’s none of the oddness, none of the archness. We can see the clothes but we can’t hear Carrie’s commentary, Carrie’s voice. I just see hanging fabric with no flavor; it feels like a light pencil drawing of an original Carrie print.

Raven Smith – Vogue columnist.

This quote is from Mr. Smith’s column on vogue.com.

Mr. Smith is speaking about the costumes for the character Carrie Bradshaw (played by Sarah Jessica Parker) in the Sex and the City HBO Max reboot, And Just Like That.

Carrie’s Fashion Adventure in Sex and The City, season six. (She wore this on the flight from NYC to Pairs.)

As soon as shooting for the reboot started in NYC in early July, social media was abuzz with quickly captured images of Carrie, Miranda (Cynthia Nixon), Charlotte (Kristin Davis) et al. on set. There was also carefully crafted PR by the production company including an official photo and a trailer. It had already been announced that Kim Cattrall as Samantha Jones would not be returning, nor would the original series (and the two films) costume designer, Patricia Field.

Ms. Field is busy making Lilly Collins look quirky in the Netflix series Emily in Paris, so she recommended her assistant Molly Rogers, who evidently worked closely with Ms. Field on the Sex and the City series and she was the main costumer on the Fox series, Star.

There we have the backstory. As for the quote, please tune in tomorrow for my two cents.

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Betye Saar, Harper’s Bazaar.

It seemed like the rule without it being a rule, starting with my sister and me when we were teenagers, that if you want something new to wear, then you had to make it. And I think that theme carried into our adult lives. Even if you find something, then you still take up a hem or add something to make it your own.

Betye Saar, American artist.

This quote is from a conversation with Ms. Saar and her three daughters in Harper’s Bazaar, May 2021.

Ms. Saar has been creating art since the early 1960s and she’s known for prints, collages, and installations that often include found objects.

Making your own clothes is very rewarding. First of all, it’s creative. Also, when you have taken the time and energy to make something you are much more invested in it. There’s no instant gratification, but instead a sense of accomplishment. The best part is that whatever you have created, it’s one of a kind.

I’m also a big fan of changing a new item in some small or big way to make it yours. I do that by changing buttons and I often add a brooch to hats as well as handbags. I also change things for practical reasons, such as taking up the hem on a dress or adding patch pockets to a cardigan sweater. (Who can stand a sweater without pockets?)

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