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Posts Tagged ‘fashionable quotes’

Illustration by Katja Spitzer from Hair: From Moptops to Mohicans, Afros to Cornrows. Prestel Press

Even though Native North American tribes had been using the Mohican for over 2,000 years, most people in 1970s London had never seen a hairstyle like this. That’s why the punks, with their heads shaves except for a narrow strip of hair from the forehead to the nape of the neck, shocked so many older Londoners at that time. Their crazy hairstyles, holey T-shirts, studded leather jackets and jewelry made from safety pins became a style that still influences fashion, art, and music to this day.

From Hair: From Moptops to Mohicans, Afros to Cornrows, by Katja Spitzer.

Come back to ODFL tomorrow for my review of this clever children’s book all about hair.

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She opened her wardrobe. Guilty by Design, she thought, looking at a black shift dress she had bought from the aptly named dress shop in Morningside, for there was a great deal of guilt involved in the buying of expensive dresses – delicious guilt; she had loved that dress and had worn it too often. Italians wore black, did they not? So something different – a red cashmere polo-neck would transform the skirt, and a pair of dangly diamanté earrings would add to the effect. There!

Isabel Dalhousie – fictional character in the book Friends, Lovers, Chocolate, the second novel in a mystery series featuring Isabel, by Alexander McCall Smith.

Guilt for buying expensive dresses? Well, no need for guilt IF the expensive dress is worn. Isabel has worn her expensive dress “too often” apparently and gotten her money’s worth. I don’t think you can wear a dress too often. As long as the dress is kept clean and and mended if needed, wear, wear, wear what you have and buy less. An LBD (little black dress) is an investment and with accessories can be styled so many different ways – worn with an elegant pair of pumps and a strand of pearls for a special occasion or with sneakers and a cardi for a casual lunch.

I think I have mentioned that I am a fan of (good) mystery novels and my current favorite is the Isabel Dalhouise series. McCall Smith sets these mysteries in Edinburgh and treats his readers to detailed descriptions of various blocks and neighborhoods giving us a real feel for the city. I love that he gently uses clothing to reflect aspects of his characters and the mysteries themselves are unusual (and perhaps a bit thin to be honest.) For example in Friends, Lovers, Chocolate, Isabel (the editor of a philosophy journal) meets a man who has recently had a heart transplant and is haunted by memories of things that didn’t happen to him. Hmm … what’s that all about? Isabel is going to find out!

What I like most about this series is hanging out with our heroine. She lives an interesting life in a big house in an old city and as a philosopher, she ponders the world and gets herself into quite a few moral dilemmas.

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Tie-dye dress from Tory Burch Spring/Summer 2013.

I have loved tie-dye since high school. It reminds me of my first concert and endless summers. Many cultures, like those in India, Japan, and Africa, have a tradition of dyeing that is unique to their region. The tie-dye pieces from our Spring 2013 runway were handmade by women artisans in the Republic of Guinea, through a partnership with the non-profit organization – There is No Limit Foundation. These artists are keeping traditions alive, while supporting their families and communities.

Tory Burch – American fashion designer.

This quote is from the book Tory Burch: In Color (Abrams).

I would wear this dress by Tory Burch. I like the simple shirtwaist silhouette, which allows the tie-dye fabric to be the focus. I also like the classic indigo blue and white combo. So crisp and chic! There’s something about dark blue with a touch of white that feels just right for September – back to school, back to work, in my case back to the writing desk – on late summer afternoons, just before we switch to autumnal colors.

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Illustration of Coco Chanel by Isabel Pin from I Am Coco: The Life of Coco Chanel (Prestel Publishing).

In order to be irreplaceable, one has to be different.

So true! This reminds me of something a local clothing manufacturer once told me. He said that people don’t want to stand out in their fashion. They want to blend in.

I can understand that. It’s easier to blend in. To not be different. Particularly in our modern world, where life is so hectic. BUT, it’s a lot less fun.

Come back to ODFL tomorrow for my review of I Am Coco: The Life of Coco Chanel by award winning children’s book illustrator, Isabel Pin.

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Taking a deep breath, I stand in front of the mirror. It is the perfect dress for a sea sprite. It is the perfect dress for me. It ripples and shimmers when I move and the color is amazing – it brings out the tiny bit of red in my hair, and the gold in my skin. Unlike the experience of wearing the beautiful dress in London, this time I don’t feel like I’m pretending to be someone else. I notice that there have been no shoes included with my costume, but this time I know that only bare feet will work.

Lou Trevelyan – 18-year-old fictional character in the book A Sky Painted Gold, by Laura Wood (Random House).

(The color of the dress that Lou is referring to is seafoam and made from organza fabric.)

A Sky Painted Gold is a coming of age story set in a village in Cornwall, England over summer 1929. I heard about this novel from Miranda Mills Comfort Book Club.

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Needle, needle, dip and dart.

Thrusting up and down,

Where’s the man could ease a heart

Like a satin gown?

See the stitches curve and crawl

Round the cunning seams –

Patterns thin and sweet and small

As a lady’s dreams.

Wantons go in bright brocades;

Brides in organdie;

Gingham’s for the plighted maid;

Satin’s for the free!

Wool’s to line a miser’s chest;

Crape’s to calm the old;

Velvet hides an empty breast;

Satin’s for the bold!

Lawn is for a bishop’s yoke;

Linen’s for a nun;

Satin is for the wiser folk –

Would the dress were done!

Satin glows in candlelight –

Satin’s for the proud!

They will say who watch at night,

“What a fine shroud!”

Dorothy Parker (d.1967), American poet. The Satin Dress was published in 1926.

Happy Birthday to Dorothy Parker, born this day in 1893.

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Designing is like a living organism in that it pursues what matters for its well-being and continuity.

Issey Miyake (1938-2022), Renowned Japanese fashion designer.

Miyake was part of the avant-garde fashion movement of the 1980s and 90s, along with Rei Kawakubo and Yohji Yamamoto. Although based in Japan and rooted in Japanese aesthetics, the designs and designers of the movement became global hits. GQ said in 1984, “These are clothes that conform to no fashion standards. They seek to abolish form. They hang loosely on the body in oversized unusual silhouettes.” Additionally the fabric was often in black and had raw unfinished edges.

In 1970 Miyake established the Miyake Design Studio in Tokyo where he experimented with textiles and design, following his own philosophy of creating clothing reflective of its time while always staying socially conscious.

RIP Issey Miyake.

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Jewelry is not fashion. It has to last, not be discarded as soon as something else comes along.

Elsa Peretti, Italian born jewelry designer (1940-2021).

Ms. Peretti designed for Tiffany & Co. and created the iconic Bone Cuff, Open Heart pendant, and Mesh Necklace.

I can’t agree more with this week’s quote. Jewelry should always be timeless, or at least we should approach it as if it were and mix it up. Certainly all of what Ms. Peretti designed is timeless. Her pieces from nearly fifty years ago are still selling at Tiffany and have become classics.

Come back tomorrow for more on Elsa Peretti.

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Image: Harper’s Bazaar.

Today, I find beauty in more unexpected places. I’ve never been much of a punk rocker, but I love the punk era. It was a time when people didn’t spend hours trying to look picture-perfect. It was rough around the edges. I don’t like things that are too perfect, clean, or groomed. I like when there’s a bit of something weird or different.

Jill Kortleve – fashion model.

Ms. Kortleve was speaking to Harper’s Bazaar magazine in the May 2022 issue.

I would say that the punk rock look wasn’t necessarily just thrown together. For some it was very much a curated look that took a lot of time and thought.

Like Ms. Kortleve, I also enjoy the unexpected in fashion. An added bit of whimsy or something just slightly off with the rest of the outfit is where we find creativity. For example – buttons on the back of a sweater, a strand of pearls worn with a hoodie, or a bee brooch placed on the cuff of a jacket. That’s the fun in fashion!

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Image: Harper’s Bazaar.

I have a couple of necklaces from my grandmother who passed away, and wearing them reminds me of her. One of her necklaces stands for power and freedom. And I think especially being a woman in the ’70s in Morocco, it was not easy. Wearing them reminds me to push through and kind of continue with what I’m doing to stay strong.

Imaan Hammam, fashion model.

This quote is from Harper’s Bazaar, May 2022.

Born and raised in Amsterdam, Ms. Hammam is Moroccan and Egyptian. She says she appreciates her multicultural background, which has allowed her to understand the world better.

I also have many pieces of jewelry from my mother and my grandmother. Whenever I slip on one of their pieces – a ring or a bracelet, a brooch or a strand of beads – I revisit a different memory of them. In that way, they are still with me.

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