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Posts Tagged ‘fashion news’

The ladies of Sex and The City (1997-2003).

Yesterday ODFL featured a quote by Vogue columnist, Raven Smith in which he commented that he was less than impressed with Carrie Bradshaw’s fashion choices in And Just Like that, the HBO Max Sex and The City reboot. (Since the series started shooting around NYC in early July, Instagram has been flooded with images of Carrie, Miranda, and Charlotte in their new garb.)

Today I’m throwing in my two cents.

I have to say I agree with Mr. Smith. As far as we can tell, there’s not much spice to Carrie’s wardrobe in the reboot, although, I did think that Ms. Field, the previous costume designer for S&TC, sometimes went too far making Carrie look pretty raunchy in sheer, short, tight dresses or just plan ridiculous – big green bird as fascinator??? But still we all loved Carrie’s sense of fashion adventure. (I liked the earlier episodes best when Carrie mixed it up with interesting vintage pieces.)

Molly Rogers, the reboot costume designer, has a thing for boho; she’s got Carrie in a long 70s looking print dress and Miranda also sporting long flowy dresses with wedge shoes. (Has Miranda retired from her high-power lawyer job?) Not only is boho not really their style, the look just isn’t that interesting and it’s had its own reboot countless times. But Carrie is also sporting some fabulous platform heels, a la 1940s style. As for Charlotte, it appears that she has gone Carmen Miranda in loud color prints, off-the-shoulder blouses paired with tight skirts. What happened to her taste for preppy-chic? That’s a look that translates well for older women, which, ahem, she is and they are.

(I mentioned in yesterday’s post that Kim Cattrall is not returning as Samantha Jones.)

Mr. Big (Chris Noth) is back in his usual corporate suits. Stanford (Willie Garson) is also joining the gang and looking spiffy in bright colors. Aidan (John Corbett) returns as well but I haven’t seen any shots of him; I look forward to finding out if it’s going be the original pudgy, long-haired Aidan of Season Three or more the slimmed down short-hair Season Four version.

There’s no word yet when the new HBO Max series will air, but we do know there are 10 half hour episodes planned for the first season.

To see some of the costumes for And Just Like That check out andjustlikethatcloset on Instagram.

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The problem is there’s no Carrie in Carrie’s Looks. There’s lots of well-meaning, inoffensive ensembles, form-flattering moments, vaguely interesting shapes. There are pieces from Carrie’s original wardrobe—the baguette, the belt, the second proposal Manolos—but there’s none of the oddness, none of the archness. We can see the clothes but we can’t hear Carrie’s commentary, Carrie’s voice. I just see hanging fabric with no flavor; it feels like a light pencil drawing of an original Carrie print.

Raven Smith – Vogue columnist.

This quote is from Mr. Smith’s column on vogue.com.

Mr. Smith is speaking about the costumes for the character Carrie Bradshaw (played by Sarah Jessica Parker) in the Sex and the City HBO Max reboot, And Just Like That.

Carrie’s Fashion Adventure in Sex and The City, season six. (She wore this on the flight from NYC to Pairs.)

As soon as shooting for the reboot started in NYC in early July, social media was abuzz with quickly captured images of Carrie, Miranda (Cynthia Nixon), Charlotte (Kristin Davis) et al. on set. There was also carefully crafted PR by the production company including an official photo and a trailer. It had already been announced that Kim Cattrall as Samantha Jones would not be returning, nor would the original series (and the two films) costume designer, Patricia Field.

Ms. Field is busy making Lilly Collins look quirky in the Netflix series Emily in Paris, so she recommended her assistant Molly Rogers, who evidently worked closely with Ms. Field on the Sex and the City series and she was the main costumer on the Fox series, Star.

There we have the backstory. As for the quote, please tune in tomorrow for my two cents.

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Betye Saar, Harper’s Bazaar.

It seemed like the rule without it being a rule, starting with my sister and me when we were teenagers, that if you want something new to wear, then you had to make it. And I think that theme carried into our adult lives. Even if you find something, then you still take up a hem or add something to make it your own.

Betye Saar, American artist.

This quote is from a conversation with Ms. Saar and her three daughters in Harper’s Bazaar, May 2021.

Ms. Saar has been creating art since the early 1960s and she’s known for prints, collages, and installations that often include found objects.

Making your own clothes is very rewarding. First of all, it’s creative. Also, when you have taken the time and energy to make something you are much more invested in it. There’s no instant gratification, but instead a sense of accomplishment. The best part is that whatever you have created, it’s one of a kind.

I’m also a big fan of changing a new item in some small or big way to make it yours. I do that by changing buttons and I often add a brooch to hats as well as handbags. I also change things for practical reasons, such as taking up the hem on a dress or adding patch pockets to a cardigan sweater. (Who can stand a sweater without pockets?)

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One of two waterfalls at the National 9/11 Memorial.

I was living in Greenwich Village, in an apartment with a terrace that faced directly onto the Twin Towers. As I was on the phone, I saw the first plane go into the first tower. I immediately thought I’d witnessed an unimaginable accident. I was still on the phone, trying to comprehend what had happened, when the second plane went into the second tower. In that moment, I knew this was no accident but an act of terrorism. My phone went dead, and I dropped to my knees watching the aftermath.

Michael Kors, American fashion designer.

This quote is from Harper’s Bazaar, September 2021.

Tuesday, September 11, 2001was the fifth day of New York Fashion Week.

The National 9/11 Memorial Waterfall. In the distance behind the trees, is the Memorial Museum.

When I was in NYC in 2019 I visited the National 9/11 Memorial. Located at the rebuilt World Trade Center the memorial is in the center of a seven building complex, which includes the 9/11 Museum. Walking around we heard only the splashing sound of the two waterfalls built exactly where the Twin Towers once stood.

A somber place, meant for respect and reflection, it feels a world away from the hectic streets of the city.

Engraved in bronze along the edge of the waterfalls are the names of all the 9/11 victims and the six victims killed in the 1993 bombing; a total of 2983.

Among the seven buildings is the tallest building in America, One World Trade Center, AKA “Freedom Tower.” In 2014 Conde Nast, the publishers of Vogue magazine, relocated here from Times Square. I pulled out my phone to take a photo and was quickly admonished by a security guard.

No photos allowed.

Anxiety still abounds.

We then wandered into the Oculus, where, in complete contrast, we found the hustle-bustle of a food court and shops galore.

It took a moment for me to adjust.

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Image curtesy of Shadelands Ranch Museum.

ODFL locals, are you looking for a summer excursion? Want to stay close to home? The Shadelands Ranch Museum in Walnut Creek has just the thing – Summer Market & Barn Sale on Sunday, August 15, 9-4. It’s an outside market selling handcrafted items, and vintage and antique treasures. There will also be food and informational vendors. As a fundraiser, the museum will sell donated vintage/antique items. The house will be open for tours – one of the last opportunities to view the Fashions Through the Years exhibit.

Grab your best summer hat and stop by the Shadelands Ranch Museum, 2660 Ygnacio Valley Road, Walnut Creek.

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Like Esther in the novel The Bell Jar and perhaps author Sylvia Plath too, I’m also impressed with the idea of matching handbag dress/skirt/anything. Although, I know it’s a little too “put together” these days, that does not stop me.

I have two skirts with matching handbags that I made myself. One I made last year with a matching mask as well. I like the “matchy-matchy” look because it’s unexpected and the repetition of pattern and color appeals to me.

The first matchy-matchy that caught my eye was way back when I was maybe four-years-old; my mother had a summer outfit – a red and white gingham dress and a light blue coat with the same gingham fabric lining. I remember that outfit so well and the matching part has inspired me ever since.

How about other matches? My sis-in-law made for me a matching cap and cross-body bag (thanks, Lori). I have a beautiful bespoke outfit – 1920s style coat with a matching skirt and a blouse that matches the lining of the coat.

There are many ways to match: hat with handbag, handbag with shoes, dress with lining of coat, hat with jacket. How about socks with scarf? OK, now I’m getting silly.

Matchy-matchy gets a bad rap as does any look that’s too put together because being fashionable is supposed to also be effortless. Hmm, how does that work?

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Last week I dressed in some of my vintage favorites and headed over to Shadelands Ranch Museum in Walnut Creek to see their current exhibit: Fashion Through the Years.

Graduation dress.

Shadelands Ranch Museum is the Colonial Revival house built by Hiram Penniman in 1903 and now it’s home to the Walnut Creek Historical Society. The “ranch” was actually a fruit and nut farm owned and run by Mr. Penniman who had previously lived in Oakland with his wife and children. The story goes that to entice his wife, Carrie, to move to the boonies known as Walnut Creek, he built this grand two-story house. This is just the beginning of the Penniman/Shadelands story, but visitors can take the house tour and hear the whole tale from knowledgeable docents.

Edwardian day dress.

During the pandemic, the museum was closed but staff took advantage of the quiet time by going through all the stuff the museum had accumulated over the years, including donations of clothing. It soon became obvious that an exhibit of these frocks was in order.

On now through August 31, 2021 Fashion Through the Years displays in every room of the house fashions from the Victorian era to the 1980s as well as accessories such as handbags, gloves, and jewelry; all of it donated to the museum by generous local residents. The displays are such that we can get up close to study the fabrics and construction, although of course no touching!

Cotton ensemble with lace detail.

Among my favorites is an Edwardian day dress, a white cotton ensemble with lace detailing, and a lovely graduation dress from the early 1900s. There is much to see in the exhibit and more to learn about Shadelands Ranch Museum. I highly recommend this to ODFL locals looking for a summer excursion close to home. (Masks are required.)

Shadelands Ranch Museum is located at 2660 Ygnacio Valley Road, Walnut Creek and is open Wednesdays and Sundays, 1-4; sometimes they’re closed for special events. Check the website.

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Everyone wants to wear a dress right now. They want to be pretty.

Camille Wright, owner of Style Consortium – an apparel showroom.

Simple, comfortable, and cute. Change into a kitten heel shoe or a sandal and go from running errands to Sunday brunch. Photo by Nugroho Wahyu on Pexels.com

Ms. Wright is speaking about what we’re wearing as we ease out of our houses and back into the world. I think what we want is to be comfortable while still looking good. Dresses are one answer to that. They’re an instant upgrade and they can be easy to wear. Plus they are the cool choice for hot temps.

Perfect for an afternoon stroll in the park, a museum visit, birthday party. Photo by Hu1ea3i Nguyu1ec5n on Pexels.com

Also, dresses offer a lot a variety in silhouette and fabric. Just slip it on and the dress does all the style work. Add accessories or not, it’s that simple.

A nice choice for the job. Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

Dresses for weekends = easy. Dresses for work? Tricky. Tailored separates seem to be more appropriate for professional situations. But here is where fabric, color, and pattern choice make the difference. Light fabrics and floral prints are better for weekends, while solid colors and jersey fabrics are good choices for work. Top with a tailored jacket and become instantly office ready.

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It’s not about rejecting fashion, but rather about valuing the fashion you have.

Vanessa Friedman, Fashion Director and Chief Fashion Critic at the New York Times.

Official White House portrait of First Lady Dr. Jill Biden. Photo: Cheriss May.

This quote is from an article Ms. Friedman wrote for the NYT about the fashions our First Lady Dr. Jill Biden chose to wear during President Biden’s recent visit to the UK for the G7 summit.

Dr. Biden shopped her closet and sported several outfits she’d worn before, perhaps sending a message of fashion sustainability, “reduce, recycle, reuse.” And love, which was actually spelled out on the back of her jacket. Ms. Friedman goes on to comment that Dr. Biden’s style is informal and “friendly.”

I think Dr. Biden’s style is in keeping with other First Ladies such as Laura Bush and Hillary Clinton: nondescript and appropriate. It’s not showy nor is it dowdy. There’s is some thought and care put into it but it doesn’t overshadow anything. I don’t think Dr. Biden is all that interested in fashion, but she always looks presentable.

Back to the sustainability message – since the fashion industry is among the biggest polluters, sustainability is going to be key as we move deeper into climate change hell. What’s stylish is what we already own and isn’t further hurting the planet.

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Recycled plastic folded and formed into a wearable garment. Issey Miyake, 2010.

What I have been trying to do, and what I have probably done, is to make clothes that seem to have existed for a long, long time. In reality they never existed. I am not a designer who creates fashionable aesthetics. I make style out of life, not style out of style.

Issey Miyake – Japanese fashion designer.

May we all find inspiration for style from everyday life.

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