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Posts Tagged ‘sustainable fashions’

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(This was originally posted on May 20th, 2015. Let’s revisit!)

Have you ever wondered who made that T-shirt you’re sporting? Jacket? Jeans? Until recently I hadn’t, nor had the film director Andrew Morgan. Then in 2013, Mr. Morgan was reading in the New York Times about the Bangladesh factory collapse in Rana Plaza. Shocked and horrified to learn of the conditions those factory workers (and many others) endure, he began to ask some basic questions: Who makes my clothes? What are their lives like? Are they better off?

In his new film, The True Cost Mr. Morgan helps answer these questions by traveling the world and talking to people in the industry from designers such as Stella McCartney to workers in far away factories. He interviews professionals about the business of fashion, globalization, consumerism and the toll all of this must-have fashion is taking on our planet and the people who make our clothes.

Mr. Morgan insists that his film is not a guilt trip but an opportunity to “… open our eyes and hearts to this idea that there are hands, physical human hands that touch the things that we wear and those hands are lives and they matter …”

Click here to watch the trailer. (It just might change your approach to fashion.)

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A lot of the resources that we use to make our clothing are not accounted for in the cost of producing those clothes. So, it has water that’s used to produce clothing, land that is used to grow the fiber, chemicals that are used to dye … those things all are inputs. As inputs they cost something and they also give outputs. In some cases good outputs – the clothing themselves, jobs. But in other cases bad outputs – harmful chemicals, greenhouse gas. And those things have costs as well. 

Mike Schragger, director Sustainable Fashion Academy

Have you ever considered what goes into your clothes? The natural resources? The labor? The skills?

There’s a trend among some in the fashion industry to take a closer look at our clothing and ask questions. Just like a few years ago when we asked about our food and where it comes from, we want to know:

  • Where are our clothes made?
  • Who made them?
  • What’s in the fabric?
  • What is the TRUE cost of our cheap clothes?

The UK based non-profit organization Fashion Revolution is sponsoring Fashion Revolution Week, April 24-30 to honor the anniversary of the Rana Plaza factory collapse, in which 1138 workers died and many were injured. Also during this time people around the world are planning events to highlight the true cost of fashion and inspire us to think and question.

One of the many campaigns is #whomademyclothes? Sport a piece of clothing inside out so the label shows. Take a selfie holding a sign that says – Who Made My Clothes? Post on Instagram and Twitter with #whomademyclothes? Make sure to share with the brand you’re wearing.

Join Fashion Revolution! Click here for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

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Image: Global Change Award.

Here’s your chance to vote and help reinvent fashion!

The non-profit H&M Foundation awards new technology ideas that help make fashion more sustainable. (The H&M Foundation was founded by the family behind the fast-fashion chain H&M.)

The Global Change Award is in its second year. Sorting through nearly 3000 submissions from 130 countries, a panel of judges chooses five winners. Then the public (YOU) is invited to vote. Each of the five is a winner but there’s a first place, second place and so on based on the number of votes. First place gets the biggest pot of money – $326,000.

All of the ideas are impressive: Manure couture, Solar textiles, Content thread, Grape leather, Denim-dyed denim.

For example: Solar textiles makes fashion fabric with water, plant waste, and sun. This fabric can replace oil-based nylon and other man-made fabrics, which create green houses gases.

You can read about each one, watch a short video, and vote your choice. It’s informative. It’s empowering. It’s fun! Tell your friends.

Voting is open now through April 2nd.

Click here and help reinvent fashion:  https://globalchangeaward.com/

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Stylist Tyese Cooper from Project Intermission.

When my fashion friend Tyese Cooper announced last summer that she was moving to Paris I was super excited for her. Then I found out what she was going to do and I was super impressed.

In December 2016 Tyese launched Project Intermission. Hey, what’s that?

Project Intermission is a Fashion Experience.

Read on:

Using her skills and talent as a stylist, Tyese consults with visitors to Paris who want to step-up their look or want to incorporate something different to their current style. It starts with a coaching session at a neighborhood cafe where discussions are about clothing and style, art, and the influence of French culture. Then it’s off to a gallery or a long walk – some space and a little time to open the mind and get inspired by the art, architecture, streets, and people of Paris.

Next, Tyese introduces her client to exclusive independent Parisian designers. In these ateliers (not boutiques but working studios) you get to meet the designers, see first hand how fashions are put together, and order a bespoke piece of clothing. Tyese says, “It’s special because once you have an insiders view of the ‘how’ of fashion, feel natural textiles, and customize what you want from each designer, you wont ever want to let it go to the landfill.”

(A key aspect to these designers handpicked by Tyese is that each one is committed to ethical and sustainable fashion, something that is important to her and a current movement in France.)

I think this is such a unique idea. Anyone can pick up a whatever from a corporate- branded boutique but Project Intermission offers a deeper fashion experience. It’s a chance to make a connection with French designers and French culture. In the end you have a story to tell and something special to add to your wardrobe.

Click here to find out more about Tyese and Project Intermission.

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ReFashionedFrontCoverReduced1-300x374I write about design as important as ecology because I don’t believe producing more ugly, boring clothing is a sustainable goal.

– Sass Brown, author and acting assistant dean of the Fashion Institute of Technology.

Ms. Brown has just published another book on sustainable fashion, Refashioned: Cutting-Edge Clothing from Upcycled Materials (Laurence Ling Publisher, 2013).

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