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Archive for the ‘Arts’ Category

Day Twelve here we are. This was made for me by my godson, although, he may have had a little help. I don’t think he or his helper knew that crescent moons are a favorite of mine. I have a collection of crescent moon brooches; come to think of it, perhaps a tree completely decorated with crescent moons is in my future.

What is in your future, readers, is another year of fashion, style, vintage, and the arts here on ODFL.

Don’t miss a post – SUBSCRIBE. On the upper right side of the front page of ODFL you can enter your email and receive a notification every time there’s a new post. Now that’s a stylish way to start the new year.

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It’s Day Eleven and we’re taking a peek underneath the tree at the felt NYC taxi cab with a Christmas tree atop.

This ornament is too big to hang, but it’s a perfect addition to the scene going on under the tree. I bought this felt cab at Leroy’s Place in Brooklyn. Yet another reminder of yet another travel adventure.

Our last day is tomorrow. You made it this far, don’t miss Day Twelve.

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Welcome to Day Ten. Today we have a boy snowshoeing, something that I would like to do some day. He’s made of wood and is hand painted. I have quite a few of these wood ornaments and they have a European feel to me.

We’re getting close to the end. Come back tomorrow.

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On Day Nine we take a trip to South Korea.

Traditional Korean clothing (called hanbok) had no pockets, so people carried little round pouches (called jumeoni) to hold their necessities. There are different styles of jumeoni and while some are embroidered most include traditional Korean knots. The ornament pictured above is made of silk fabric in traditional Korean colors and is a welcome reminder of my travels to South Korea.

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Day Five of The Twelve Days of Tree Ornaments is hand made from salt dough.

I found this festive fowl along with several other salt dough ornaments shopping one day after Christmas. Isn’t he charming? He’s nicely preserved with some kind of shellac, which is why I have had him all these years. Miniature ornaments are hard to come by, so this was a lucky find.

Check back tomorrow for Day Six and see what more luck I’ve had.

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Merry Christmas and welcome to Day One of The Twelve Days of Tree Ornaments.

I have a collection of miniature tree ornaments to fit my tabletop tree and this year I’m sharing some of my favorites.

This ski bunny actually sits underneath the tree as he’s the right size but, he’s made of metal and is too heavy for the branches. He’s articulated and could actually ski right down that felt hill I created, with a little help. I found him on sale in a high end gift store after one holiday season. I love the humor of this little bunny and he’s wearing a festive sweater!

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The Twelve Days of Christmas tradition on ODFL continues. This year the theme is miniature tree decorations.

One Christmas season my mother gave me a plastic tabletop tree. Since she was/is allergic to live Christmas trees, this was our replacement. It stands about two feet tall and I put it on my coffee table. That was the start of many years of collecting miniature ornaments that fit on my small tree. In the beginning, since I didn’t have a lot, I used vintage earrings and when I traveled I’d buy a souvenir keychain take off the ring and put a ribbon on it – perfect for an ornament and a nice reminder of my travels.

After all the holiday hustle bustle check in with ODFL on Christmas Day for The Twelve Days of Tree Ornaments. Then settle in for eleven more days of ornaments and the little tales that go with them.

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This is my childhood stocking. It’s made from burlap and has seen many a Christmas morning.

The stockings were hung by the chimney with care,

In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there.

This week’s quote is from A Visit from St. Nicholas, by Clement Clarke Moore, 1822.

Stockings are a favorite Christmas tradition. When I was growing up, stockings were just for kids, but it seems now everyone gets one.

The story goes that in the 4th century CE good old St. Nicholas dropped some coins down the chimney of needy families and the coins just happened to slip into stockings hanging near the fire to dry. The idea caught on and eventually expanded into a Christmas Morning tradition. The first Christmas stockings would have been everyday plain but, by the early 20th century commercialized pre-packaged stockings were for sale as were embellished stockings.

I was recently reminded of the joys of Christmas stockings by a blog post, The Holiday Stocking written by Becca Carr from Tatter, a textile library located in Brooklyn. Tatter offers classes and unique items for sale, all to do with fabric. They also publish a journal and a blog called The Fold.

Here’s to Christmas stockings!

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Chanel slingbacks.

When it comes to my own style I am very much a uniform dresser. Shoe-wise, it’s kind of what your grandma would wear, which is why I was drawn to these Chanel slingbacks. I purchased them five years ago at the brand’s SoHo store in New York and saved up all my money to do so. I’m not a heels person. They always make me feel overdressed and not in my own skin. But I needed one classic shoe that I could have forever and would look nice with everything.

Maggie Holladay, furniture designer and founder of Claude Home.

I found this quote in the December 2021 issue of Harper’s Bazaar.

Chanel slingback shoes sell for $925. That sounds like a lot, but for a quality classic shoe that one can wear forever with everything (almost) it’s not that bad. There’s much about this quote that I like –

1. The fact that Ms. Holladay saved up to buy her shoes. Saving up for something special, waiting, thinking about it, planning the big trip to the store when you can finally pay and take it home – that’s what I call a treat and a memorable one. Slipping out the credit card? Too easy. Not memorable. I once saved for a Coach handbag. It was a present to myself after my first year of graduate school. I still have that bag, of course, and it reminds me of a very important accomplishment. I could have whipped out the credit card, sure, but that wouldn’t have been as much fun. Instant gratification is overrated.

2. Uniform dressing. My mother did this and I tend toward it too, although I always add an accessory. My mother favored skirts and button-down shirts for her daily wear with perhaps knee socks and flat shoes if she was staying home or sheer stockings and a low heels if she was running errands. Skirts and t-shirts, or sweaters are my daily go-to as well. It’s nice to have several outfits already created that you can just pull out, dress, and go.

3. Investment in a classic. Buy one quality thing and wear it forever. One pair of classic shoes for special or professional occasions. One wool winter coat. One hardy suit (maybe two). You get the picture. Quality over quantity.

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Julie Rubio

I had the pleasure of meeting Julie Rubio several years ago when I interviewed her for an article in the Lamorinda Weekly. She had just opened a boutique in Lafayette and I have kept up with her ever since. An award winning film producer as well as a business woman, Julie produced the hit movie East Side Sushi among other films and now she’s working on something close to her heart –Tamara De Lempicka, the first full-length documentary on the famous artist from the Art Deco era.

De Lempicka (1898-1980) painted fashionable people of the 1920s and 1930s, making her paintings a fascinating study for anyone interested in fashion history. A stylish woman herself, she modeled for a French fashion magazine, designed her own hats, and donned fashions by Coco Chanel. Today her works sell for millions of dollars and are collected by the likes of Donna Karan, Barbra Streisand, and Madonna.

Julie was kind enough to agree to a Q&A with ODFL.

What is it about Tamara that attracts you?

Her will to not only survive but thrive through some really horrific times and create beauty out of her pain. 

What do you think Tamara’s message is to women of today?

Unleash the chains that bind you. Go out after your dreams and make them happen. As she would say, “There are no miracles there is only what you make.”

Tamara’s work is very collectable, what is it about her style that speaks to people? I think it’s unquestionable that her work speaks to people in a way that, if you’re fond of her work, it draws you in. Her paintings look at you and you can see into the soul of each painting.  It’s quite powerful – the eyes and the flawlessness of each portrait. Her paintings haunt you in a really good way.

In terms of her fashion style, what could we learn from her? 

To be bold and beautiful. Not to be afraid to elevate the room.

Gucci dress. You would rock this, Julie!

If you were to meet Tamara, take her out to dinner – where would you take her and what would you wear?

The restaurant at Meadowood is traveling to my favorite restaurant in Mexico City called Pujol. It’s quite simply one of the best restaurants in the world. Nothing flashy but the food is outstanding. I think Tamara would really like this restaurant considering she loved Mexico.  I would wear something free-flowing, risqué and beautiful. Gucci has this lace black dress that’s completely see-through and beautiful with the most exquisite bustiers. I’d simply go for it, when it came to my outfit and I’d wear a hat! 

Thank you, Julie. I love your comment, “Not to be afraid to elevate the room.” Let’s elevate all the rooms! And I agree that Tamara’s unique artistic style really stays with you.

Julie is working closely with Tamara’s family, who have granted her access to photos, stories, and artworks. The film is set to be released next year and in the meantime fundraising continues. Click here for more information.

Artwork by Tamara de Lempicka. Copyright 2021 Tamara de Lempicka Estate LLC. All rights reserved.

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